@heinzi-Lindenstrasse-Fan-Forum

Off-Topic => Board-Lexikon => Thema gestartet von: heinzi am 26 Oktober 2006, 15:15:16



Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: heinzi am 26 Oktober 2006, 15:15:16
auf Anregung von Hanswurtebrot


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 26 Oktober 2006, 15:40:21
Oh... thanks so much, Heinzi!  :bussi:

Anybody here with English as native language? I've been learning since only six years because my first chosen foreign language at school was Latin. I think my English isn't too bad but I still admire people with an excellent pronunciation and a big vocabulary.

I've English as an advanced course at school, my best opportunity to try my language skills was in March and April 2004 when I spent two months in San Francisco and Los Angeles as an exchange student.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 26 Oktober 2006, 17:07:17
Quote: 
(hanswurtebrot @ 26 10 2006,15:40)

Anybody here with English as native language?


I don´t think so,  John (?) Sausagebread.  :)  

My English teacher at High school was a native american (and very cute, by the way), and I think he has had a considerable influence on me and my pronounciation, because the first thing I was asked when I spoke English at university was if I had learnt English in the United States.  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Marcus am 26 Oktober 2006, 17:15:59
Well, maybe Vivian has learned English as native language?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 26 Oktober 2006, 17:21:56
Quote: 
(Marcus @ 26 10 2006,17:15)

Well, maybe Vivian has learned English as native language?


No, she has not because she was born in Belgium in the German Language District.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 26 Oktober 2006, 17:26:22
Quote: 
(das Glückskind @ 26 10 2006,17:07)

Quote: 
(hanswurtebrot @ 26 10 2006,15:40)

Anybody here with English as native language?


I don´t think so,  John (?) Sausagebread.  :)


Lucky Child: The English Translation for the German "Hans" is Jack.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 26 Oktober 2006, 17:32:14
Quote: 
(hanswurtebrot @ 26 10 2006,15:40)

I've English as an advanced course at school, my best opportunity to try my language skills was in March and April 2004 when I spent two months in San Francisco and Los Angeles as an exchange student.


My goodness, HWB, tell me a place in the world you haven't been there.  :O

The first time I had been in a foreign country,  I was 15 years old. 1966 in the Netherlands.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 26 Oktober 2006, 17:52:41
Quote: 
(bockmouth @ 26 10 2006,17:32)

Quote: 
(hanswurtebrot @ 26 10 2006,15:40)

I've English as an advanced course at school, my best opportunity to try my language skills was in March and April 2004 when I spent two months in San Francisco and Los Angeles as an exchange student.


My goodness, HWB, tell me a place in the world you haven't been there.  :O


Australia, New Zealand, (South) Africa, Asia (except Turkey) ...






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Marcus am 26 Oktober 2006, 17:54:16
Quote: 
(bockmouth @ 26 10 2006,17:32)

The first time I had been in a foreign country,  I was 15 years old. 1966 in the Netherlands.


I was nine months old. 1982 in Switzerland. ;-)






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 26 Oktober 2006, 17:58:42
My first time in a foreign country was in summer 1996 (8 years old).
I flew to Fuerteventura with my mother.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 26 Oktober 2006, 18:28:32
This fred is fantastic.

I have been in these European countries: The Netherlands, France, Luxembourg, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, close to the Czechoslowakian Border, Spain, Belgium, Andorra, Monaco, Switzerland, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy and Austria.

If you signify the former GDR as a separate state I can add one more country.






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 26 Oktober 2006, 18:40:58
Okay, I will list the European countries I've visited:

The Netherlands (1x), Belgium (2x), Luxembourg (countless), Austria (7x), Italy (9x), Vatican (2x), France (2x), Spain (3x), Great Britain (2x), Ireland (2x), Finland (1x), Malta (2x), Bosnia-Herzegowina (1x), Czech Republic (1x) and the European part of Turkey (1x).


Non European countries:
U.S.A. (2x), Mexico (2x), Canada (1x), Ecuador (1x), Israel (1x) and the Asian part of Turkey (1x).


In 1989 I went to the GDR but I don't count this.






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 26 Oktober 2006, 18:57:34
Blot out because I wrote stupidness first.





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Lunatic am 26 Oktober 2006, 20:35:39
has anyone of you ever went to Walt Disney World in Orlando?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Mondkalb am 26 Oktober 2006, 22:10:23
Quote: 
(bockmouth @ 26 Oct. 2006,17:26)

Quote: 
(das Glückskind @ 26 10 2006,17:07)

Quote: 
(hanswurtebrot @ 26 10 2006,15:40)

Anybody here with English as native language?


I don´t think so,  John (?) Sausagebread.  :)


Lucky Child: The English Translation for the German "Hans" is Jack.


But isn't "Jack" a sort of nickname for "John"? Similar to "Dick" and "Richard". At least "Hans" is an abbreviation for names like "Johann" or "Johannes" and the english translation should be "Jonathan" and short "John". I know that it is "Juan" in Spain.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 27 Oktober 2006, 10:56:38
Quote: 
(Mondkalb @ 26 10 2006,22:10)

But isn't "Jack" a sort of nickname for "John"? Similar to "Dick" and "Richard". At least "Hans" is an abbreviation for names like "Johann" or "Johannes" and the english translation should be "Jonathan" and short "John". I know that it is "Juan" in Spain.


Yes, Jack is a sort of nickname for John, and Hans is an abbreviation for Johann, but the English version of Johann is John, not Jonathan.

According to Wikipedia (what did we do before they invented themselves?), Jonathan is not a variation of John, but a name in its own right. (See John here). So it should be Jack indeed.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 27 Oktober 2006, 11:43:00
I thought that Jack was an abbreviation for James. At least James was Cutie-the-English-teacher's name, and he was called Jack by his colleagues.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Ilse am 27 Oktober 2006, 11:48:21
Quote: 
(Lunatic @ 26 10 2006,20:35)

has anyone of you ever went to Walt Disney World in Orlando?


No, but I am proud to say, that I've been at Graceland (Memphis/Tennesee) and I that Elvis ist really dead......


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 27 Oktober 2006, 12:35:24
Quote: 
(Eisblume @ 27 10 2006,10:56)

According to Wikipedia (what did we do before they invented themselves


Good question, you 're perfectly right, dear Ice Flower...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 27 Oktober 2006, 14:31:30
Quote: 
(das Glückskind @ 27 10 2006,11:43)

I thought that Jack was an abbreviation for James. At least James was Cutie-the-English-teacher's name, and he was called Jack by his colleagues.


It seems to be rather difficult with "Jack", I never thought about James.

But: It's no wonder that your cute teacher was called Jack, because, again according to Wikipedia, James is derived from the same Hebrew name as Jacob. And it's only a small step from James/Jacob to Jack, isn't it?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 27 Oktober 2006, 14:46:13
Nice to see that everybody thinks about my nickname...  :p

By the way: In English advanced course we read Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" at the moment. Not a bad book but the best English novel I've ever read was "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding last year.

Last year I've started to read Harry Potter VI but I've admitted to me that it was too difficult.  :blush:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 27 Oktober 2006, 15:00:39
Quote: 
(Eisblume @ 27 10 2006,14:31)

But: It's no wonder that your cute teacher was called Jack, because, again according to Wikipedia, James is derived from the same Hebrew name as Jacob. And it's only a small step from James/Jacob to Jack, isn't it?


Yes, it's the logical next step, as Vivian would say.  :;):
Jake works well as an abbrev. of Jacob, too.

So, JohnJack, you don't like"Brave New World" too much? Neither did I.
I think Harry Potter is not that difficult to read, once you're "in it" and caught by its magic. Stay tuned.  :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 27 Oktober 2006, 15:01:27
Your nickname: Right, we will call you Hans, that should settle it...

Harry Potter: Oh, you shouldn't give up on that, maybe you should try again now! It has been a long time since I was forced to read Brave New World, but I could imagine that it is quite difficult as well. At least I can remember that the foreword nearly was enough for me...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Benevolo am 27 Oktober 2006, 16:06:56
Quote: 
(hanswurtebrot @ 27 10 2006,14:46)

By the way: In English advanced course we read Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" at the moment. Not a bad book but the best English novel I've ever read was "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding last year.


Oh Thank goodness, Johnny Saussagebread  :O

You still read this dull literature at school nowadays?
I already red this almost 20 years ago!

Don't they have any idea about reading more current things?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Benevolo am 27 Oktober 2006, 16:09:14
Oh sorry Iceflower,

I didn't really notice your posting but I do agree with you!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 27 Oktober 2006, 16:31:27
Quote: 
(Benevolo @ 27 10 2006,16:06)

Quote: 
(hanswurtebrot @ 27 10 2006,14:46)

By the way: In English advanced course we read Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" at the moment. Not a bad book but the best English novel I've ever read was "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding last year.


Oh Thank goodness, Johnny Saussagebread  :O

You still read this dull literature at school nowadays?
I already red this almost 20 years ago!

Don't they have any idea about reading more current things?


My English teacher (unfortunately he is also my tutor) is born in 1947, he teaches since 35 years with same methods. I hate his lessons.

We did read last year:
Ernest Hemingway: "The Old Man and the Sea"
Arthur Miller: "Death of a Salesman"
William Golding: "Lord of the Flies"
E. R. Braithwaite: "To Sir, with Love"
William Shakespeare: "Macbeth"

This year so far:
Aldous Huxley: "Brave New World"






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Benevolo am 27 Oktober 2006, 16:40:21
OMG - Oh - my - God  :O

Poor Johnny

I expected some hints about new and interesting english books from you.

But is it only the fault of your old-fashioned teacher or of general ancient teaching programmes (???)

What do other classes an courses read?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 27 Oktober 2006, 16:47:16
Quote: 
(Benevolo @ 27 10 2006,16:40)

What do other classes an courses read?


Quite the same literature, Benevolo.

The syllabus doesn't leave many space in view of the outstanding "Landesabitur 2007" in the state of Hesse.

But - fortunately - I have still another advanced course: Music...  :1luvu:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Benevolo am 27 Oktober 2006, 16:53:42
Oh I always considered Hesse as a modern and progressive state.

But, what do you expect from a state governed by such a prime minister!  :p


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 27 Oktober 2006, 16:59:22
Well... first and foremost our Minister of Education, Karin Wolff, would gladly be shot of me!

But Roland Koch is a story in itself, you're right...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 27 Oktober 2006, 18:46:31
Folks,

I'm sitting here with laugh tears in my eyes.

When I don't stop reading your exellent postings I've to roll over the floor laughing. :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 27 Oktober 2006, 18:50:40
Quote: 
(bockmouth @ 27 10 2006,18:46)

When I don't stop reading your exellent postings I've to roll over the floor laughing. :D


... because of the large number of mistakes in my postings?  :blush:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 27 Oktober 2006, 19:27:53
Quote: 
(hanswurtebrot @ 27 10 2006,18:50)

Quote: 
(bockmouth @ 27 10 2006,18:46)

When I don't stop reading your exellent postings I've to roll over the floor laughing. :D


... because of the large number of mistakes in my postings?  :blush:


No no, not at all, but because all the users' humour.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Mondkalb am 27 Oktober 2006, 19:46:37
Quote: 
(Benevolo @ 27 Oct. 2006,16:06)

Quote: 
(hanswurtebrot @ 27 10 2006,14:46)

By the way: In English advanced course we read Aldous Huxley's "Brave New World" at the moment. Not a bad book but the best English novel I've ever read was "Lord of the Flies" by William Golding last year.


Oh Thank goodness, Johnny Saussagebread  :O

You still read this dull literature at school nowadays?
I already red this almost 20 years ago!

Don't they have any idea about reading more current things?


In my opinion "Brave new world" has quite current contents.
Just that it's old doesn't it mean it's old-fashioned, not even remotely! And the only reason for thinking it's dull is that you read it in school. That is probably the real problem. I had it with most of the literature we read in school. But it's not the literature, it's the teachers.

Where is the point in reading "current" books just to appear "up to date" or "hip". English (or german or any language) lessons are not  there to explain you the newest publications. You can get that from the "Spiegel Bestsellerliste" or "Amazon Highlights". But that's got nothing to do with literature. Some books are not called "classics" for no reason.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Mondkalb am 27 Oktober 2006, 20:01:40
Oh! Due to my agitation I nearly forgot: thank you Eisblume for the Wikipedia-link with the name explanations. That's really a lot of information.

And regarding Harry Potter (yes, Harry Potter is great literature): the difficulties are probably the "technical terms". All this "cauldron" and "broom" stuff. Once you get used to it it's not too (*) difficult. And it's definitely worth the effort, the original english version is orders of magniude better than the translation (at least than the german translation). I had this problems when I started to read Pratchett's Discworld novels in english, I was simply not used to this kind of vocabulary.


(edit: "too" with two "o"s? Yes. Well, my english ist obviously still not too good, despite the english discworld novels)






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: EdnaKrabappel am 28 Oktober 2006, 09:11:10
Quote: 
(bockmouth @ 27 10 2006,19:27)

[...]No no, not at all [...]


Why do I suddenly hear Frank´n´Furter?  :;):

"...in another dimension, with voyeuristic intentions..."


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 30 Oktober 2006, 16:44:46
Quote: 
(EdnaKrabappel @ 28 10 2006,09:11)

Quote: 
(bockmouth @ 27 10 2006,19:27)

[...]No no, not at all [...]


Why do I suddenly hear Frank´n´Furter?  :;):

"...in another dimension, with voyeuristic intentions..."


Edna: Thank you very much, now I have the whole soundtrack going round and round in my head, all at the same time...  :confused:  I wonder how long it takes to get rid of that?!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: scrooge am 30 Oktober 2006, 16:50:48
Quote: 
(hanswurtebrot @ 26 10 2006,15:40)

I've been learning since only six years because my first chosen foreign language at school was Latin.


Well, let's count some peas:

It's not "since" but "for" in this sentence.

Since 1996, since 2 o'clock, since Wednesday, but for 6 years, for 2 hours, for 9 months etc.

@ Mooncalf: "too" with double-o is correct here. Too much, too difficult.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 30 Oktober 2006, 16:56:55
Quote: 
(Eisblume @ 30 10 2006,16:44)

Thank you very much, now I have the whole soundtrack going round and round in my head, all at the same time...  :confused:  I wonder how long it takes to get rid of that?!


Until you get the next catchy tune (earworm).
Hmm, I really would like to help you with another song, but all I can think of is "touch-a touch-a touch-a touch me, I wanna be dirty ... "  :dance:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 30 Oktober 2006, 17:04:31
Yes, that helps a lot, at least it's only ONE song at a time.  :mecker:
Well, I suppose I need to turn on the radio...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 30 Oktober 2006, 17:09:42
Quote: 
(das Glückskind @ 30 10 2006,16:56)

Until you get the next catchy tune (earworm).


Another little pea: ear-wig -  not earworm, please...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 01 November 2006, 11:30:10
Bocki, I asked BEOlingus before, and there it says that "earwig" is the zoological term, while - meaning the catchy tune - it is called "earworm".

What does "Bockmouth" mean, by the way?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 01 November 2006, 12:15:16
Quote: 
(das Glückskind @ 01 11 2006,11:30)

Bocki, I asked BEOlingus before, and there it says that "earwig" is the zoological term, while - meaning the catchy tune - it is called "earworm".

What does "Bockmouth" mean, by the way?


I also didn't know that, until he told me!

Bockmouth = Bocklemünd  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 01 November 2006, 13:16:12
:O

*faint*


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 01 November 2006, 15:24:09
Quote: 
(das Glückskind @ 01 11 2006,11:30)

Bocki, I asked BEOlingus before, and there it says that "earwig" is the zoological term, while - meaning the catchy tune - it is called "earworm".


Lucky Child you're right of course.

Stupid me didn't see the words 'catchy tune' in the dictionary.

The one who is able to read has get an advantage.



If the Lime*-Tree Street Studios would be in

Cologne-Bilderstöckchen my nick were *Little Picture Stick*
Blumenberg = Flowerhill
Kalk = Lime*
Sülz = Aspic
Vingst = Whitsuntide (bad translation!)
Vogelsang =Birdsong
Zollstock = Foot-Rule

Look there, Linde and Kalk have got the same word in the English language, very interesting.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: nachteule am 01 November 2006, 18:36:00
Hey what kind of interesting fred!!!  :O
It seems to be very funny!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 01 November 2006, 18:38:38
Isn't it, Night Owl!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 01 November 2006, 19:21:44
whoa, I should start writing here now since my trip to Australia is coming closer.

I was talking for more than 2 hours today with my buddies in Australia and Japan via Skype and we were discussing our plans for next year's trip. We'll meet for about one week in Cairns and are gonna have a great time, that's for sure. We already laughed so hard on the phone. I'm really looking forward to see them again.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 01 November 2006, 19:31:19
Markus, did you talk to your friends in English or in German?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 01 November 2006, 19:33:13
they're both germans, I studied together with them.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 01 November 2006, 19:37:24
Oh, I see. Thanks.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: nachteule am 01 November 2006, 23:26:14
Quote: 
(markus @ 01 11 2006,19:33)

they're both germans, I studied together with them.


I don't know why! But that reminds me when I had been on a tip to Cologne last year with a friend of mine a man spoke to us on the station Deutz and he asked us where we come from. He asked us in English!!! And we told him: "From Northern Germany." The man: "Oh! And I'm from Augsburg. How are you?"
 :pfanne:
He spoke English again!!!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 02 November 2006, 00:20:58
You've already seen horses chundering in front of the chemist's.

(Denglisch)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 02 November 2006, 11:28:44
Quote: 
(nachteule @ 01 11 2006,23:26)

Quote: 
(markus @ 01 11 2006,19:33)

they're both germans, I studied together with them.


I don't know why! But that reminds me when I had been on a tip to Cologne last year with a friend of mine a man spoke to us on the station Deutz and he asked us where we come from. He asked us in English!!! And we told him: "From Northern Germany." The man: "Oh! And I'm from Augsburg. How are you?"


That happened to us in Prague, about a million times. Someone addressed us at the street, asking something in an english-german-mix, until one of us remarked: "Oh, you're german, too? So why do we speak English?"  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 02 November 2006, 15:25:59
Quote: 
(bockmouth @ 01 11 2006,15:24)

If the Lime*-Tree Street Studios would be in

Cologne-Bilderstöckchen my nick were *Little Picture Stick*
Blumenberg = Flowerhill
Kalk = Lime*
Sülz = Aspic
Vingst = Whitsuntide (bad translation!)
Vogelsang =Birdsong
Zollstock = Foot-Rule

Look there, Linde and Kalk have got the same word in the English language, very interesting.


Bockmouth, you enlighten me! I always thought that the German "Linde" is called "linden" in English, and I never heard of a tree called "lime"... So, you made we wonder, and I found out that the tree which gave the TV series its name is called "lime" in Britain and "linden" in North America. Tssss... you live and learn!

And, to top off you Kalk and Linde bit of knowledge: The citrus fruit Limone, similar to a lemon, but green not yellow used to make Caipirinha, is called "lime" as well!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: scrooge am 02 November 2006, 16:41:35
Quote: 
(das Glückskind @ 02 11 2006,11:28)

That happened to us in Prague, about a million times. Someone addressed us at the street, asking something in an english-german-mix, until one of us remarked: "Oh, you're german, too? So why do we speak English?"  :D


That's much nicer than what happened to a friend of mine and me in Inverness. A guy asked us: "Excjuus mi, du ju schbiek Tschöaman?" My friend and I: "Ja." His answer: "So schaugt's aa aus."


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 02 November 2006, 18:10:49
:O  What a git! A bavarian git.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 02 November 2006, 20:22:09
this reminds me of a great joke:

Two strangers meet in London. They start a conversation but they have to use their dictionary quite often.

A: "Hello, Sir! How goes it you?"
B: "Oh, thank you for the afterquestion."
A: "Are your already long here?"
B: "No, first a pair days. I'm not out London."
A: "Thunderweather, that overrushes me, you see not so out."
B: "That can yes beforecome. But now what other: my hairs stood to mountains as I the traffic saw. So much cars gives it here."
A: "You are heavy on the woodway if you believe that in London horsedroveworks go."
B: "Will we now drink a beer? My throat is outdried. But look, there is a guesthouse, let us there man go!"
A: "That is a good idea. Equal goes it loose, I will only my shoeband close."
B: "Here we are. Make me please the door open."
A: "But there is a beforehangingcastle, the economy is to. How sorry! Then I will go back to the hotel, it is already retard. On again see!"
B: "Oh, yes, I will too go. I must become my draught to Bristol. Auf Wiedersehen!"
A: "Nanu, sie sind Deutscher?"
B: "Ja, sie auch? Das wundert mich aber. Ihr Englisch ist so hervorragend, dass ich es gar nicht bemerkt hatte..."


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: timo1979 am 02 November 2006, 20:40:51
Quote: 
(bockmouth @ 26 10 2006,17:26)

Quote: 
(das Glückskind @ 26 10 2006,17:07)

Quote: 
(hanswurtebrot @ 26 10 2006,15:40)

Anybody here with English as native language?


I don´t think so,  John (?) Sausagebread.  :)


Lucky Child: The English Translation for the German "Hans" is Jack.


OMG: Imagine our beloved "Limestreet" hero's name would be Jack Beimer!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 02 November 2006, 20:41:46
wouldn't it be Jack Bbucket?  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: timo1979 am 02 November 2006, 20:42:57
Quote: 
(Mondkalb @ 27 10 2006,19:46)

Some books are not called "classics" for no reason.


But there ARE classics that have been written AFTER 1945.  :;):


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 02 November 2006, 20:44:02
Dr. Piper  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: timo1979 am 02 November 2006, 20:45:44
Quote: 
(markus @ 02 11 2006,20:41)

wouldn't it be Jack Bbucket?  :D


Probably Jack Stewart or something the like. Oh yes, that's fun - let's rename all our Limestreet heroes into English!

Jack Stewarts wife would be Anne Bricks, her children Sarah, Thomas and Sophia Bricks.

Jack Stewarts ex-wife would be Helen Stewart, their children Mary, Ben and Nick Stewart.

Not to forget: The famous Louis Turner, MD. Or his late wife Elizabeth's gay son, Christian Whistle, MD.






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 02 November 2006, 21:08:21
Markus' posting reminds of something:

My friend was in London in a restaurant and said: "I become a steak."


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Mondkalb am 02 November 2006, 22:31:54
Quote: 
(timo1979 @ 02 Nov. 2006,20:42)

Quote: 
(Mondkalb @ 27 10 2006,19:46)

Some books are not called "classics" for no reason.


But there ARE classics that have been written AFTER 1945.  :;):


Of course there are. So what? That doesn't make them better than older books. It makes them different. Because they (their authors) are influenced by different historical, social, political... circumstances. Because they were influenced by different other (older) books and authors. Because in different ages different literary styles were established (or regarded as fashion).

Imagine this argument in a history lesson: "Ooh, but there were important historical events after 1945, why do we have to learn the dull things which happened before? Let's forget about that!"

And I'm sure you wouldn't tell your physics teacher "Yuck, what do you mean, 'actio=reactio', that was discoverd by Newton, he lived AGES ago, even my father learned this old-fashioned rubbish, start teaching us some RECENT physical theories!!"

Then why do you think you can argue like this in literature?






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 02 November 2006, 23:13:18
Quote: 
(timo1979 @ 02 11 2006,20:45)

let's rename all our Limestreet heroes into English!


rest in peace, Elisabeth Ring

and welcome, Frank Sign Meniant, son of Tanja Sign Meniant and Susan Judge

who else have we got:

Lisa Hopemaster
Ines Ring, born Chandler
Morris Sparrow
Christian Burner
Rosemary Cook

... guess that's all for the translatable names


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 02 November 2006, 23:20:29
Mr. "Do I disturb" Matthew Stonebridge.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 02 November 2006, 23:22:55
Fabian Fieldman

Benno Carpenter






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 02 November 2006, 23:23:58
and don't forget Wolf Turnjoke :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 02 November 2006, 23:29:14
Just the time George Ash Hamlet is in NY and Carsten Flutist has to wash a lot of bed-linen.





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 02 November 2006, 23:34:28
Andrea Newman
Susan Judge

....and the Goatlers


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Benevolo am 03 November 2006, 11:00:28
And Helga Bymore is frying mirroreggs


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: timo1979 am 03 November 2006, 15:42:13
Quote: 
(Mondkalb @ 02 11 2006,22:31)

Imagine this argument in a history lesson: "Ooh, but there were important historical events after 1945, why do we have to learn the dull things which happened before? Let's forget about that!"

Then why do you think you can argue like this in literature?


Well, I didn't. What I actually meant was: Why did I NEVER hear anything about anything that happened in the world after 1945 in my history classes?

I don't put older against more recent books (or facts, for that matter) - we should read (and learn) them all.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Beate am 05 November 2006, 14:45:47
Quote: 
(markus @ 02 Nov. 2006,23:13)

Quote: 
(timo1979 @ 02 11 2006,20:45)

let's rename all our Limestreet heroes into English!


Ines Ring, born Chandler


Ines Ring, nee or formerlyChandler, please!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 05 November 2006, 17:11:35
i checked my dictionary: The french word née is used in England? I wouldn't have thought that.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Pythagoras am 07 November 2006, 20:11:07
And there are also Carsten Flutist's former boyfriends Gert Winegrower and Robert Angel. And, of course, Sabrina, Roberto and Enzo Letter! And don't forget Lea Strong.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 10 November 2006, 19:19:11
Any Guardian readers here?

I just love Guardian talk and this thread made me laugh out loud:
http://talk.guardian.co.uk/WebX?128@437.7dVKm9IzkYZ.2@.7759e6da

Edit: Gone ...






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 06 Dezember 2006, 16:29:45
gelöscht, da nach Jahren uninteressant  





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 06 Dezember 2006, 16:58:26
Ich hab mal nur den ersten Absatz gelesen.

Mir ist aufgefallen: "Benedikt suggest going to eat". Bei suggest fehlt ein "s" und "going to eat" kommt mir komisch vor. Aber dafür haben wir ja Experten.

"Mr. Schönbach keeps in mind that we have to do that in the evening." Wolltest du damit sagen, dass er das "im Kopf behalten will" oder dass er euch darauf hingewiesen hat?

Ansonsten finden sicher unsere Englisch-Profis noch mehr.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 06 Dezember 2006, 19:52:27
sollte das ganze nicht im Past Tense geschrieben sein? Schließlich schreibst du über was, das bereits passiert ist.





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 06 Dezember 2006, 20:34:30
@ Salessia:

Das suggest-s ist mir mittlerweile selbst auch aufgefallen.
Nach suggest kommt immer ing-Form, von daher müsste "going to eat" richtig sein...

To keep something in mind heißt, dass er auf etwas hinweist bzw. nochmal ins Gedächtnis rufen will...



@ Markus:

Meine früheren Protokolle habe ich auch immer in Past Tense geschrieben, doch da hat er gemeckert und Present Tense gefordert... klingt zwar komisch, aber naja...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Mondkalb am 06 Dezember 2006, 20:39:18
Quote: 
(hanswurtebrot @ 06 Dec. 2006,16:29)

Hallo liebe Heinzis, die ihr der englischen Sprache einigermaßen mächtig seid,

hätte jemand von euch Lust und Zeit, sich mal nachfolgendes Protokoll einer Englischstunde von mir durchzulesen und mich auf Rechtschreib- und/oder Grammatikfehler hinzuweisen?

Vielleicht macht sowas hier ja jemandem Spaß, wäre echt super nett! Ansonsten ist auch nicht schlimm.

Grüße,
Hanswurtebrot

-----------------------------------


Ok, ich versuchs mal. 100%ige Garantie kann ich nicht geben, wenn ich nicht sicher bin, schreibe ich das dazu.




Topics of the lesson:

(...)
3.   Comparing of the homework from November 29th, 2006



Ich würde schreiben Comparison of the...



Reference to 1.

(...)Mr Schönbach hands out our new book “Short Stories from Australia and New Zealand” and collects 8.95 € from the class. Many pupils want to pay in the next lesson because they did not have enough money with them.



because they do not have...
Du hast den Rest auch in der Gegenwart geschrieben. Oder Du machst es wie Markus vorschlägt, alles im past tense. Ich weiß nicht, ob es da für Protokolle allgemeine Vorschriften gibt.

Und das mit den 8,95 Euro von der Klasse klingt inhaltlich komisch, denn es sollte ja jeder einzelne soviel bezahlen. (oder?). Da würde ich schreiben 8.95 € from everybody in the class


Benedikt suggest going to eat with the class after our second English test on December 12th, 2006.



suggests


(...)
Mr Schönbach keeps in mind that we have to do that in the evening because the headmaster Mrs Eiser-Müller would not grand her permission for a visit during school-time.



Die Formulierung finde ich auch seltsam, weiß aber spontan keine andere.
Und grant mit "t".


(...)
Finally Dania suggests making “Wichteln” in the class, but the majority of the students are not really interested.



Meines Wissens steht hinter "suggest" immer "to". suggests to make "wichteln"...? Das klingt zwar auch komisch, könnte aber am deutschen Wort "wichteln" liegen.
Edit: Ok, vergiß die Anmerkung mit dem "suggest to". Es kam mir wohl wirklich nur wegen dem "wichteln" so komisch vor.



Reference to 3.

(...)
Lyn recites her answer to b) and means the phrase “children of the sun” (line 3) expresses their big happiness before the tourists came.


"to mean" heißt doch "bedeuten", oder? Vielleicht supposes  oder assumes?



(...)
Soja adds their speaking in a sarcastic way and for Katharina it is a big contrast to their detailed description of the Australian culture and landscape. Christian interprets the boys’ words as a kind of subjective irony they use to make the primitiveness of the foreigners clear.



Oh, jetzt dachte ich erst "make clear" wäre ein Germanizismus wie umgekehrt "Sinn machen", aber das gibts wirklich. Allerdings
sollte der Satzbau im englischen sein: make clear the primitiveness...


Reference to 4.

(...)
Fabian means they have a problem with being pumped for details.



s.o.



Mehr ist mir nicht aufgefallen. Ich hoffe, ich habe keine zusätzlichen Fehler reingebracht.






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 06 Dezember 2006, 20:56:17
Ohhh... vielen Dank Mondkalb! ... und auch an Salessia und Markus!  :bussi:

Der Fehler mit "to mean" ist ja wirklich peinlich...  :blush:
Natürlich heißt "mean" bedeuten...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Mondkalb am 07 Dezember 2006, 18:39:59
Gern geschehen.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 07 Dezember 2006, 20:34:08
"8,95 € from the class" ist wirklich ein bisschen seltsam, ich würde da "8.95 € per person" oder sowas in der Art sagen.
Ich würde statt "going to eat" "going out for a meal together" oder "going out for dinner" schreiben.

Bei "Mr Schönbach makes a comment on the quiz “Australia: What do we know about it?” we got on November 23rd, 2006." verstehe ich das "got" nicht.

Noch was: Bei "At the sacred rock “Uluru” there live creatures like serpent people, mice women or kangaroo-rat men" ist das "there" imho überflüssig.
Außerdem klingt das so, als würden solche Wesen dort tatsächlich leben. Ich würde das irgendwie mit "are believed to live" konstruieren.
Statt "the tragedy of the destroying" würde ich "the tragedy of the destruction" schreiben.

Man könnte noch mehr ändern, aber das führte hier zu weit (ist ja schließlich dein Text  :) ).

Edit: Ich glaubs nicht - wegen dem Text habe ich jetzt "Eastenders" auf BBC1 verpasst.  :O






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 07 Dezember 2006, 21:38:15
Quote: 
(Tulpe @ 07 12 2006,20:34)

Ich glaubs nicht - wegen dem Text habe ich jetzt "Eastenders" auf BBC1 verpasst.  :O


Mea culpa, mea maxima culpa!  :blush:  :blush:  :blush:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 07 Dezember 2006, 21:52:21
Nicht nötig, das war doch meine eigene Schuld.
Außerdem werden alle 4 Folgen der Woche am Sonntagnachmittag in einer Omnibus-Ausgabe (ja, so heißt das wirklich) wiederholt.
Ich muss also nicht dumm sterben ... :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Krümelmonster am 09 Dezember 2006, 15:22:35
Quote: 
(Tulpe @ 10 11 2006,19:19)

Any Guardian readers here?


This was my favourite newspaper during my exchange semester. I've tried to read the online-issue after my return, but there are too many interesting articles and I have not enough time.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 11 Dezember 2006, 16:46:27
I read the Guardian first thing in the morning, then I have a look at the message boards.
Often quite hilarious ...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Girlfriend am 16 März 2007, 19:49:11
Kann mir jemand sagen, was die folgenden Textstellen auf deutsch heißen? Bis auf die jeweils 2 - 3 letzten Worte verstehe ich es.

When you believe there's nothing you can't overcome
When you believe the end is brighter than the sun


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 21 März 2007, 10:56:56
Ich würde sagen: "Du kannst nicht überleben" und "heller als die Sonne"!   ???


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Girlfriend am 22 März 2007, 21:53:43
Danke, D21, aber ich glaube, das, was im Fragen Thread steht, passt besser.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 12 Mai 2007, 14:04:28
Wie spricht man "poll" aus? So wie "Paul" oder wird das "O" so wie in "no" gesprochen?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Simone am 12 Mai 2007, 14:10:58
Eher so wie in 'no', aber noch ein bißchen kürzer.





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 12 Mai 2007, 14:12:19
Thank you! :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: timo1979 am 12 Mai 2007, 14:57:58
Quote: 
(salessia @ 12 05 2007,14:04)

Wie spricht man "poll" aus? So wie "Paul" oder wird das "O" so wie in "no" gesprochen?


Am ehesten wie in "November".


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 31 August 2007, 12:23:46
ENGLISH IS TOUGH STUFF


Dearest creature in creation,
Study English pronunciation.
I will teach you in my verse
Sounds like corpse, corps, horse, and worse.
I will keep you, Suzy, busy,
Make your head with heat grow dizzy.
Tear in eye, your dress will tear.
So shall I! Oh hear my prayer.

Just compare heart, beard, and heard,
Dies and diet, lord and word,
Sword and sward, retain and Britain.
(Mind the latter, how it's written.)
Now I surely will not plague you
With such words as plaque and ague.
But be careful how you speak:
Say break and steak, but bleak and streak;
Cloven, oven, how and low,
Script, receipt, show, poem, and toe.

Hear me say, devoid of trickery,
Daughter, laughter, and Terpsichore,
Typhoid, measles, topsails, aisles,
Exiles, similes, and reviles;
Scholar, vicar, and cigar,
Solar, mica, war and far;
One, anemone, Balmoral,
Kitchen, lichen, laundry, laurel;
Gertrude, German, wind and mind,
Scene, Melpomene, mankind.

Billet does not rhyme with ballet,
Bouquet, wallet, mallet, chalet.
Blood and flood are not like food,
Nor is mould like should and would.
Viscous, viscount, load and broad,
Toward, to forward, to reward.
And your pronunciation's OK
When you correctly say croquet,
Rounded, wounded, grieve and sieve,
Friend and fiend, alive and live.

Ivy, privy, famous; clamour
And enamour rhyme with hammer.
River, rival, tomb, bomb, comb,
Doll and roll and some and home.
Stranger does not rhyme with anger,
Neither does devour with clangour.
Souls but foul, haunt but aunt,
Font, front, wont, want, grand, and grant,
Shoes, goes, does. Now first say finger,
And then singer, ginger, linger,
Real, zeal, mauve, gauze, gouge and gauge,
Marriage, foliage, mirage, and age.

Query does not rhyme with very,
Nor does fury sound like bury.
Dost, lost, post and doth, cloth, loth.
Job, nob, bosom, transom, oath.
Though the differences seem little,
We say actual but victual.
Refer does not rhyme with deafer.
Foeffer does, and zephyr, heifer.
Mint, pint, senate and sedate;
Dull, bull, and George ate late.
Scenic, Arabic, Pacific,
Science, conscience, scientific.

Liberty, library, heave and heaven,
Rachel, ache, moustache, eleven.
We say hallowed, but allowed,
People, leopard, towed, but vowed.
Mark the differences, moreover,
Between mover, cover, clover;
Leeches, breeches, wise, precise,
Chalice, but police and lice;
Camel, constable, unstable,
Principle, disciple, label.

Petal, panel, and canal,
Wait, surprise, plait, promise, pal.
Worm and storm, chaise, chaos, chair,
Senator, spectator, mayor.
Tour, but our and succour, four.
Gas, alas, and Arkansas.
Sea, idea, Korea, area,
Psalm, Maria, but malaria.
Youth, south, southern, cleanse and clean.
Doctrine, turpentine, marine.

Compare alien with Italian,
Dandelion and battalion.
Sally with ally, yea, ye,
Eye, I, ay, aye, whey, and key.
Say aver, but ever, fever,
Neither, leisure, skein, deceiver.
Heron, granary, canary.
Crevice and device and aerie.

Face, but preface, not efface.
Phlegm, phlegmatic, ass, glass, bass.
Large, but target, gin, give, verging,
Ought, out, joust and scour, scourging.
Ear, but earn and wear and tear
Do not rhyme with here but ere.
Seven is right, but so is even,
Hyphen, roughen, nephew Stephen,
Monkey, donkey, Turk and jerk,
Ask, grasp, wasp, and cork and work.

Pronunciation -- think of Psyche!
Is a paling stout and spikey?
Won't it make you lose your wits,
Writing groats and saying grits?
It's a dark abyss or tunnel:
Strewn with stones, stowed, solace, gunwale,
Islington and Isle of Wight,
Housewife, verdict and indict.

Finally, which rhymes with enough --
Though, through, plough, or dough, or cough?
Hiccough has the sound of cup.
My advice is to give up!!!

-- B. Shaw


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: suppengirl am 31 August 2007, 12:32:02
Oh, there actually IS an English-Fred!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: SirGuinness am 31 August 2007, 13:21:21
Indeed Ma'am ...! So I said ...!

... you little joke-biscuit, you ...!






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: timo1979 am 31 August 2007, 16:22:20
Quote: 
(SirGuinness @ 31 08 2007,13:21)

... you little joke-biscuit, you ...!


:jestera:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 31 August 2007, 16:25:59
That's more than a tough stuff.  :O


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 31 August 2007, 17:38:40
Quote: 
(suppengirl @ 31 08 2007,12:32)

Oh, there actually IS an English-Fred!


Of course there is.
Did you think we just had the "Bavarian <-> German" one?  :;):


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: SirGuinness am 31 August 2007, 17:49:53
BTW: wird "MissJones" dann vielleicht wie MissJeans ausgesprochen?





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: catweazle am 22 Oktober 2007, 18:43:29
Is this one still alive?  :p


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 15 Januar 2008, 13:08:03
Heißt "Horst" auf Englisch "refuge"?   ???


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 15 Januar 2008, 13:27:43
Wenn "Horst" wie "Zuflucht" (z. B. Adlerhorst) gemeint ist, und nicht Horst wie in beispielsweise, äh... Horst Heldt, kann das richtig sein.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 15 Januar 2008, 14:23:31
Danke!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Frannie am 18 Januar 2008, 13:35:39
Quote: 
(bockmouth @ 25 10 2006,19:28)

This fred is fantastic.

I have been in these European countries: The Netherlands, France, Luxembourg, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, close to the Czechoslowakian Border, Spain, Belgium, Andorra, Monaco, Switzerland, Great Britain, Ireland, Italy and Austria.

If you signify the former GDR as a separate state I can add one more country.


Hey, I´ve just found that thread. Nice.

My mother was English, born in London, but of German origin. Her parents were Germans, but lived in London for more than 30 years. My grandfather had a bakery in Brixton (´part of London) and made the weddingcake for  the Duke and Duchess of York (later King George and Queen Mom).
In WW II my grandpa was being held in a POW camp on the Isle of Man and my grandmother had to return to Germany with her three daughters.

Unfortunately I wasn´t raised bilingual, so I had to learn it at school as any other German pupil. And I was not good at it in school. (My father was chief translator at Ford Motor Company). My parents were thinking of giving me free for adoption.  :laugh:
Only after school I began to develop an interest in learning English (more or less) thoroughly.
I ´ve been reading English books - mostly crime fiction, serial murder stuff - for ages, so I´m able to read English more or less fluently. My written English is pretty good, I think, but listening and speaking is quite poor. :disapprove:  Just not enough practice here in Germany.
At the moment my English is getting more and more rusty. Oh well...

I´m just reading "The Analyst" by Katzenbach. An extreme thrilling crime novel about an analyst and his patient (who wants to kill him). It´s not an easy read like Harry Potter, much more demanding - but very exciting. A real page turner and a good lead role for Michael Douglas.






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 18 Januar 2008, 18:21:10
True, your English is pretty good ...  :D
One minor flaw: it's to give so. up for adoption, not free.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 18 Januar 2008, 18:53:52
Heute im ICE gelesen:

We would like to take leave of our passengers in Freiburg


Ist das korrektes Englisch?

(auf Deutsch hieß es kurz vorher "Wir verabschieden uns von unseren Fahrgästen, die in Freiburg aussteigen")


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 18 Januar 2008, 19:04:33
Laut Leo stimmt der Ausdruck, aber wahrscheinlich sagt das niemand so in dem Zusammenhang. Klingt seeeehr formell und dem Anlass nicht angemessen.

Ich kenne nur "to take leave of one's senses" = den Verstand verlieren, durchdrehen, von allen guten Geistern verlassen werden, also quasi wörtlich "sich von seinem Verstand verabschieden".






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 19 Januar 2008, 20:06:26
Wäre doch korrekt, wenn die sagen würden: " We say good-bye to our passengers"  - oder ist das falsch ausgedrückt?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 19 Januar 2008, 21:49:37
Finden sie wahrscheinlich nicht schick genug.  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: suppengirl am 20 Januar 2008, 01:23:11
Sie könnten ja auch sagen: Piss off, now!

 :evilgrin1:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 20 Januar 2008, 13:08:58
Quote: 
(suppengirl @ 20 01 2008,01:23)

Sie könnten ja auch sagen: Piss off, now!

 :evilgrin1:


Etwas offtopic:

Da gab es neulich in Münster einen Beleidigungsprozess.

Ein Afrikaner und ein Polizeibeamter gerieten bei einer Passkontrolle in Streit:

Der Afrikaner sage angeblich: PEACE
und der Polizist verstand angeblich: PISS

Weiss allerdings nicht, wie die Sache vor dem Kadi ausgegangen ist...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: timo1979 am 20 Januar 2008, 17:15:28
Quote: 
(bockmouth @ 20 01 2008,13:08)

Der Afrikaner sage angeblich: PEACE
und der Polizist verstand angeblich: PISS


Dann ist der Beamte ziemlich dumm. Was für eine Beleidigung ist denn "Piss"?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 20 Januar 2008, 17:27:44
Nun, für deutsche Beamtenohren ist das nicht gerade sehr fein.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: timo1979 am 21 Januar 2008, 10:47:38
Quote: 
(bockmouth @ 20 01 2008,17:27)

Nun, für deutsche Beamtenohren ist das nicht gerade sehr fein.


Na, aber er hätte sich doch denken können, dass "geh urinieren!" keine Beleidigung sein kann.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: suppengirl am 21 Januar 2008, 21:00:54
Naja, in Österreich ist "Gehn's scheiß'n" aber sehrwohl eine Beleidigung!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 23 Januar 2008, 21:20:34
Noch ne Frage an die Englisch-Experten:

Was bedeutet die Abkürzung "VP"?


Ich lese gerade "A year in the merde" (übrigens ein sehr unterhaltsames Buch über einen Engländer, der ein Jahr in Paris verbringt) und da hat sein Arbeitgeber ein neues Produkt für den englischen Markt so labeln wollen. Als der Engländer dann seinem franz. Chef erklärt hat, was es bedeutet, hat der laut gelacht und war froh, dass sie die Idee wieder verworfen haben. Nur erklärt wurde es nicht, was es bedeutet.

Aber wofür gibt es Heinzis :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: SolarShine am 24 Januar 2008, 00:53:34
Quote: 
(Girlfriend @ 16 03 2007,19:49)

Kann mir jemand sagen, was die folgenden Textstellen auf deutsch heißen? Bis auf die jeweils 2 - 3 letzten Worte verstehe ich es.

When you believe there's nothing you can't overcome
When you believe the end is brighter than the sun


Wenn du glaubst es gibt nichts dass du nicht ueberstehen kannst.

Wenn du glaubst dass das Ende heller ist als die Sonne.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 24 Januar 2008, 12:03:49
Quote: 
(markus @ 23 01 2008,21:20)

Noch ne Frage an die Englisch-Experten:

Was bedeutet die Abkürzung "VP"?
...


Das kommt auf den Zusammenhang an, das kann alles Mögliche bedeuten:

http://acronyms.thefreedictionary.com/VP


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Frannie am 25 Januar 2008, 13:58:43
Quote: 
(Tulpe @ 17 01 2008,19:21)

True, your English is pretty good ...  :D
One minor flaw: it's to give so. up for adoption, not free.


:( Well, yes I am pretty good at grammar, but those little words... prepositions...

in, on, at, up, for, to...

horrible.

I think you have to live in that country to really become an expert.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kinski am 28 Mai 2008, 10:55:04
Mal eine dumme Frage: "James" entspricht doch dem deutschen "Jakob", oder?

Und "Jack"?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 28 Mai 2008, 13:22:18
Meines Wissens entspricht Jack im Deutschen Hans, das müsste dann wohl von Johann hergeleitet sein.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 28 Mai 2008, 15:12:45
Correct! :)

Jack ist die Kurzform von John.
Und John heißt Johannes.

Die englische Kurzform von Jakob ist übrigens Jake.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kinski am 28 Mai 2008, 17:53:04
Aha, und was ist dann James?  :confused4:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 28 Mai 2008, 18:25:41
Quote: 
(Tiamat @ 28 05 2008,15:12)

Jack ist die Kurzform von John.


Das ist ein klasse Satz :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 28 Mai 2008, 18:53:54
Quote: 
(Kinski @ 28 05 2008,17:53)

Aha, und was ist dann James?  :confused4:


Ah entschuldige, hab mich etwas falsch ausgedrückt... ich dachte mehr an den englischen Jakob bzw. Jacob.  :blush:

Aber James ist natürrrrlich die englische Form von Jakob.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 20 Juni 2008, 09:19:33
Wie sagen noch mal die Amis bzw. Engländer zur normalen Post im Gegensatz zur Email?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 20 Juni 2008, 09:28:31
Das wäre dann wohl "mail".  :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 20 Juni 2008, 09:53:05
Ja, aber sagen die nicht "snake mail" oder so ähnlich? Es soll ja darum gehen, den Unterschied zur Email zu betonen!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 20 Juni 2008, 09:56:51
wenn, dann wohl snail mail

snake ist die Schlange, snail die Schnecke.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 20 Juni 2008, 10:10:33
Danke, Markus, ich hatte geahnt, dass ich das falsch abgespeichert habe!





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Malke am 20 Juni 2008, 10:12:48
Bei uns in der Firma heißt es "white mail", wenn jemand was per Papierpost schickt.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 20 Juni 2008, 10:28:52
verschickt ihr dann auch blackmail? :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Malke am 20 Juni 2008, 10:34:22
*kicher*
Das widerspräche dem Code of Conduct, den wir als brave Mitarbeiter natürrrlich jährlich neu unterschreiben.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Krtek am 20 Juni 2008, 16:54:17
Müsst Ihr den nur unterschreiben? Wir haben zusätzlich ein paar Selbstlernmodule mit abschließender "Lernerfolgskontrolle". Da gehen dann gut zwei Stunden für drauf.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Paloma am 22 Juni 2008, 21:19:15
Wie empfindet Ihr das neudeutsche "public viewing"? Das Schwäbische Tagblatt brachte gestern einen kleinen Artikel dazu und warnte davor, diesen Ausdruck englischen Muttersprachlern gegenüber zu verwenden, denn das heiße soviel wie Leichenschau und es würde einen seltsamen Eindruck hinterlassen, wenn man allzu sehr von der tollen Stimmung bei der Leichenschau schwärmt...
Dass Deutsche sich manchmal englische Wörter ausdenken, die für Muttersprachler nicht nachvollziehbar sind, kennen wir ja vom Handy. Aber ich frage mich, ob der Schreiber des Artikels nicht ein wenig überinterpretiert, wenn er behauptet, ein Muttersprachler würde zwangsläufig an Leichenschau denken, wenn er public viewing hört. Ich meine, viewing bedeutet Besichtigung, das mag krumm übersetzt sein, aber hat doch nicht zwangsläufig was mit Leichen zu tun, oder?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 23 Juni 2008, 00:03:43
fällt mir jetzt das erste Mal auf, wo du das sagst. "Public watching" wäre ja eigentlich richtig, oder?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 23 Juni 2008, 22:04:48
Ich dachte, "man" sagt jetzt "Rudelgucken"?  :p


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Paloma am 26 Juni 2008, 21:47:13
Heute warf ein Leserbriefschreiber das Archiv des Guardian in die Waagschale. Dort wird public viewing anscheinend sehr wohl im Zusammenhang mit dem gemeinsamen Gucken von Sportveranstaltungen auf Großleinwänden genannt.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: ayin am 09 Juli 2008, 13:42:38
Es heisst auch Public Viewing.
to watch meint im englischen eher etwas zu beobachten.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 09 Juli 2008, 19:04:32
naja, man trifft sich doch, um gemeinsam das Spiel zu beobachten :;):


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Oldfield am 21 Juli 2008, 12:23:41
Quote: 
(Paloma @ 22 06 2008,21:19)

Wie empfindet Ihr das neudeutsche "public viewing"? Das Schwäbische Tagblatt brachte gestern einen kleinen Artikel dazu und warnte davor, diesen Ausdruck englischen Muttersprachlern gegenüber zu verwenden, denn das heiße soviel wie Leichenschau und es würde einen seltsamen Eindruck hinterlassen, wenn man allzu sehr von der tollen Stimmung bei der Leichenschau schwärmt...
Dass Deutsche sich manchmal englische Wörter ausdenken, die für Muttersprachler nicht nachvollziehbar sind, kennen wir ja vom Handy. Aber ich frage mich, ob der Schreiber des Artikels nicht ein wenig überinterpretiert, wenn er behauptet, ein Muttersprachler würde zwangsläufig an Leichenschau denken, wenn er public viewing hört. Ich meine, viewing bedeutet Besichtigung, das mag krumm übersetzt sein, aber hat doch nicht zwangsläufig was mit Leichen zu tun, oder?


So ist es.

Woher das Gerücht mit der Leichenschau kam, das sich während der EM virusartig durch's Land gefressen hat, würd ich auch gern mal wissen.
Hier wird es widerlegt - und gezeigt, dass "Public Viewing" im Englischen auch mit der uns vertrauten Bedeutung verwendet wird.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: shelby am 15 August 2008, 21:40:35
Interessanter, teils lustiger Neusprech-Link zum Stöbern: Wordspy :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 18 Oktober 2008, 07:31:55
Why does nobody write in the board lexicon?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: SirGuinness am 18 Oktober 2008, 11:41:16
Maybe if you create another thread: "German for runnaways ...?"  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 19 Oktober 2008, 06:07:25
Quote: 
(Tiamat @ 28 05 2008,15:12)

Correct! :)

Jack ist die Kurzform von John.
Und John heißt Johannes.

Die englische Kurzform von Jakob ist übrigens Jake.


Ist John nicht eigentlich die Kurzform von Jonathan?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 19 Oktober 2008, 06:08:29
Quote: 
(SirGuinness @ 18 10 2008,11:41)

Maybe if you create another thread: "German for runnaways ...?"  :D


:evilgrin1:  :jestera: Have you kalle Fiss?  ???


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 19 Oktober 2008, 06:09:46
Quote: 
(SirGuinness @ 18 10 2008,11:41)

Maybe if you create another thread: "German for runnaways ...?"  :D


"Do you speak English?"







Yes, a baar Brocke!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 23 Oktober 2008, 15:13:11
Quote: 
(D21 @ 18 10 2008,00:31)

Why does nobody write in the board lexicon?


What do you want me to write?
give me a topic .....  :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 24 Oktober 2008, 09:50:50
Do you have the text of "Sweet Molly Mallone"?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 24 Oktober 2008, 14:59:35
Quote: 
(D21 @ 24 10 2008,02:50)

Do you have the text of "Sweet Molly Mallone"?


Do you mean this one?

In Dublins fair city, where the girls are so pretty,
I once met a girl called sweet Molly Malone,
As she wheeled her wheelbarrow, through the streets broad and narrow,
Crying cockles and mussels` Alive alive o

Alive alive oh,
Alive alive oh
Crying cockles and mussels,
Alive alive oh.

She wheeled her wheelbarrow through the streets broad and narrow,
Just like her mother and father before
And they wheeled their wheel barrow,
through the streets broad and narrow,
crying cockles and mussels alive alive oh

My love had a fever and no one could save her,
And that was the end of sweet Molly Malone,
But her ghost wheels her barrow
through the streets broad and narrow
crying cockles and mussels alive-alive oh.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Loxagon am 27 Oktober 2008, 20:25:36
Oh, my English is ... How could I say?
Horrible? My Grammar ... But Vokabeln (kA was Vokabeln auf Englisch heiß) are not a Problem. Most time!

At the moment I play a English-Speak RPG on my NintendoDS - Luminous Arc. This is NEVER (!) relased in Germany (And GErman not, too!)

Story: 1000 Years Ago, God Luminous was sealed by the Witches. Today ... The Church Prays "We are holy - All witched must killed. Condemn the Dark - Protect the Light..."
But is this true? Play itself!  :;):


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 28 Oktober 2008, 00:56:39
Vocables! :D

Playing RPGs in English is a good way to learn the language. I own a lot of them. Star Ocean, Shin Megami Tensei, etc.
I know LumiArc, too, but I don't play it 'cause it's a tactical RPG.

I'm playing Final Fantasy IV on my new DSlite - love it!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 28 Oktober 2008, 01:00:35
Quote: 
(Tiamat @ 28 10 2008,00:56)

Vocables! :D


I always said "vocabulary".  :O


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 28 Oktober 2008, 01:27:02
Don't worry, that's correct, too. And "vocabulary" is of course the most used word. :)

I just didn't want to sound like a nerd so I took "vocables" 'cause he used "are" in his sentence. :D






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 28 Oktober 2008, 01:30:45
I didn't know, what a nerd is, but now I do. Many thanks to Leo!  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Malke am 28 Oktober 2008, 09:14:07
Once a friend told me, nerd stands for "never ever rightly done".


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 28 Oktober 2008, 10:25:29
You can test your nerd factor: Are you a nerd?

It also stands for Pharrell Williams' magnificent band: N.E.R.D. :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Malke am 28 Oktober 2008, 10:50:32
In the late eighties there was an episode of the audience participation TV-show "Sally Jessy Raphael" called: "My Father is a Nerd". I've recorded it  on VHS, and the cassette still exists.

It was so strange and so funny what all those nerds did at home and even in public. And they were not at least ashame of their behavior. They sat comfortably in their studio chairs and let their grown up sons and daughter tell their stories while the audience screamed with laughter.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 28 Oktober 2008, 14:19:15
Quote: 
(Tiamat @ 27 10 2008,17:56)

I'm playing Final Fantasy IV on my new DSlite - love it!


yupp, playing that too a bit, but mostly WoW right now.
That reminds me, the new expansion pack should be out soooooooon ... woohoo!!!!!!!  :dance:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doozer am 29 Oktober 2008, 18:33:59
How should Germans pronounce "Edinburgh"? Like the English do: "Ädnbraa" or eher "so wie man's schreibt"?





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 29 Oktober 2008, 18:55:45
Quote: 
(doozer @ 29 10 2008,11:33)

How should Germans pronounce "Edinburgh"? Like the English do: "Ädnbraa" or eher "so wie man's schreibt"?


i just ask my coworkers. they said "idenburk" (spoken german), but they are all yankies ....


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 29 Oktober 2008, 20:12:18
Pronounce it as the English do, because that's the way it's pronounced. Same for Worchester (Wustah) or Leicester (Lestah) :)





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doozer am 29 Oktober 2008, 20:27:40
@Kat:This is curious. I am looking forward to learning many different versions, so let's go, Heinzis, do brainstorming for me... :cafe:  :daume: (Hoidernoi there are many new smilies *just now discover*)





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 29 Oktober 2008, 20:31:28
Wow, I just discovered them now, too. Cool. I like this one:  :baehh:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 29 Oktober 2008, 22:03:08
I've just ordered something online. The website says it will deliver it via "Air Economy Bubble". I've chosen it 'cause it was the cheapest option.

Is it the same like airmail that we know?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 30 Oktober 2008, 13:35:03
Quote: 
(Tiamat @ 29 10 2008,15:03)

I've just ordered something online. The website says it will deliver it via "Air Economy Bubble". I've chosen it 'cause it was the cheapest option.

Is it the same like airmail that we know?


I order a lot with "air economy bubble", it's the bubble wrap they are using instead of a box, so it takes the weight down a notch, but still being shipped via air carrier (at least here)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 30 Oktober 2008, 18:27:36
Oh now I see what it means. Thanks! :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 30 Oktober 2008, 18:31:18
ur welcome ....


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 31 Oktober 2008, 18:39:52
Quote: 
(Kat @ 24 10 2008,14:59)

Quote: 
(D21 @ 24 10 2008,02:50)

Do you have the text of "Sweet Molly Mallone"?


Do you mean this one?

In Dublins fair city, where the girls are so pretty,
I once met a girl called sweet Molly Malone,
As she wheeled her wheelbarrow, through the streets broad and narrow,
Crying cockles and mussels` Alive alive o

Alive alive oh,
Alive alive oh
Crying cockles and mussels,
Alive alive oh.

She wheeled her wheelbarrow through the streets broad and narrow,
Just like her mother and father before
And they wheeled their wheel barrow,
through the streets broad and narrow,
crying cockles and mussels alive alive oh

My love had a fever and no one could save her,
And that was the end of sweet Molly Malone,
But her ghost wheels her barrow
through the streets broad and narrow
crying cockles and mussels alive-alive oh.


This is one of my favourite songs.

Isn't that really beautiful?


Now I've an "earworm in my ears....


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 31 Oktober 2008, 18:44:51
http://de.youtube.com/watch?v=VcOEONSQMww&feature=related


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 07 November 2008, 18:09:53
hat jemand ne idee wie man "That's the way the cookie crumbles...." ins deutsch uebersetzen kann?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 14 November 2008, 16:28:54
Laut Leo: So ist das Leben.

Ich habe eben einen schönen Reklamespruch für Zelte gelesen:
"Argos Sale: Now is the winter of our discount tents"  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 14 November 2008, 17:20:49
:D  Ich liebe Zelte, wo? Ich glaub, ich könnt im Zelt wohnen, wenn's nur in der richtigen Gegend wär..


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 14 November 2008, 18:12:46
Stratford-upon-Avon?  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 20 November 2008, 20:11:03
Quote: 
(Tulpe @ 14 11 2008,09:28)

"Argos Sale: Now is the winter of our discount tents"  :D


Why the heck would they sell tents in the winter time. Are they kinda insulated or something? I don't get it …  :(


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 23 November 2008, 20:28:47
Quote: 
(Kat @ 20 11 2008,20:11)

Quote: 
(Tulpe @ 14 11 2008,09:28)

"Argos Sale: Now is the winter of our discount tents"  :D


Why the heck would they sell tents in the winter time. Are they kinda insulated or something? I don't get it …  :(


Kat, I'm in shock ...

This slogan is paraphrasing Gloucester's famous speech in Shakespeare's Richard The Third:
"Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this sun of York;
And all the clouds that lour’d upon our house
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried."

Richard The Third Act 1, scene 1, 1–4

And of course tents are cheaper in winter - nobody wants them.






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 24 November 2008, 17:55:44
Quote: 
(Tulpe @ 23 11 2008,13:28)

Quote: 
(Kat @ 20 11 2008,20:11)

Quote: 
(Tulpe @ 14 11 2008,09:28)

"Argos Sale: Now is the winter of our discount tents"  :D


Why the heck would they sell tents in the winter time. Are they kinda insulated or something? I don't get it …  :(


Kat, I'm in shock ...

This slogan is paraphrasing Gloucester's famous speech in Shakespeare's Richard The Third:
"Now is the winter of our discontent
Made glorious summer by this sun of York;
And all the clouds that lour’d upon our house
In the deep bosom of the ocean buried."

Richard The Third Act 1, scene 1, 1–4

And of course tents are cheaper in winter - nobody wants them.


LOL ---- I have literally no clue about Shakespeare ….


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 25 November 2008, 19:54:49
Well, I thought it was quite clever, actually ... :D
(discontent - discount tents)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 26 November 2008, 02:32:13
Actually, on second thought ----- it is quite unique (after reading up on it).
But the question still remains, who would know that, without being familiar with Shakespeare? Maybe if I had seen the commercial …..

But anyway, speaking of ads, the most beautiful ad in a magazine I have ever seen was a Mercedes Benz ad: was just the hood of the car and a nice female hand on it: “Mercedes WAS a woman” …

It’s an old one, but I still love it


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 26 November 2008, 09:55:48
Well Kat, it IS a rather well know citation (almost like "To be or not to be") and it's also the titel of a novel by John Steinbeck.

It's a euphemism that is used for a period of destitution and dissatisfaction.
The summer that follows (by this sun = son of York) is the period when times are getting better.
It's often used by and for politicians. (E.g. someone used it for the next president: "Now is the winter of our discontent made glorious summer by this sun of Hawaii." )

Just have a look at Google:

http://www.google.com/search?....=Search

I really like this phrase ...  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 26 November 2008, 21:50:50
Well, call me stupid, but I still don't know that phrase - guess Margot failed me once again.  :;):


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 27 November 2008, 17:50:24
Darum heißt es ja auch so schön: Heinzi bildet!  :D

(And I would never call you stupid just because you are not familiar with a phrase - what would that make me?  :;): )






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 10 Dezember 2008, 18:45:33
I am passing this on to you because it definitely worked
for me, and we all could probably use more calm in our
lives.
 
Some doctor on television this morning said that the way to achieve inner peace is to finish all the things you have started.
So I looked around my house to see things I'd started and hadn't finished & before leaving the house this morning, I finished off a bottle of Merlot, a
bottle of Shardonay, a bodle of Baileys, a butle of wum, a pockage of Prunglies, tha mainder of bot Prozic and Valum scriptins, the res of the Chesescke an a box a chocolets.
 
Yu haf no idr how gud I fel rite now.

Peas tel dis to dem yu fee AR in ned ov inr pece..

Mar krishmas


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 12 Dezember 2008, 23:39:53
:jestera:  :jestera:  :jestera:

I'll post this at once in the English forum I occasionally visit.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 13 Dezember 2008, 18:48:42
The Italian in Florida

One day ima gonna Florida to bigga hotel.

Ina Morning I go down to eat breakfast. I tella waitress I wanna two pissis
toast. She brings me only one piss. I tella her I want two piss. She say go
to the toilet. I say you no understand. I wanna to piss onna my plate. She
say you better not piss onna plate, you sonna ma bitch. I don't even know
the lady and she call me sonna ma bitch.

Later I go to eat at the bigga restaurant. The waitress brings me a spoon
and knife but no fock. I tella her I wanna fock. She tell me everybody wanna
fock. I tell her you no understand. I wanna fock on the table. She say you
better not fock on the table, you sonna ma bitch. I don't even know this
lady either and she call me sonna ma bitch.

So I go back to my room inna hotel and there is no shits onna my bed. Call
the manager and tella him I wanna ****. He tell me to go to toilet. I say
you no understand. I wanna **** on my bed. He say you better not **** onna
bed, you sonna ma bitch. I don't even know the man and he call me sonna ma
bitch.

I go to the checkout and the man at the desk say: "Peace on you".

I say "Piss on you too, you sonna ma bitch, I gonna back to Italy."


 :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 19 Dezember 2008, 21:47:06
So .... there you are , having a dinner party ..

Your parents are there ,

Your in-laws are there ,

Your boss and his wife are there ,

The minister and his wife are there ,

You're all settling down for a nice relaxing evening dinner ,

Then in walks the dog ..


<click>


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 20 Dezember 2008, 22:40:46
Oops ...  :jestera:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 22 Dezember 2008, 12:16:27
Ich grübel seit Wochen, wie man die Werbung von Vodafonde "Make the most of now" übersetzt.

Macht das meiste von jetzt? :O


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 22 Dezember 2008, 13:05:16
Carpe Diem.  :;):


Quote: 
(Kat @ 10 12 2008,18:45)

I am passing this on to you because it definitely worked
for me, and we all could probably use more calm in our
lives.
 
Some doctor on television this morning said that the way to achieve inner peace is to finish all the things you have started.
So I looked around my house to see things I'd started and hadn't finished & before leaving the house this morning, I finished off a bottle of Merlot, a
bottle of Shardonay, a bodle of Baileys, a butle of wum, a pockage of Prunglies, tha mainder of bot Prozic and Valum scriptins, the res of the Chesescke an a box a chocolets.
 
Yu haf no idr how gud I fel rite now.

Peas tel dis to dem yu fee AR in ned ov inr pece..

Mar krishmas


:jestera:

Great!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 22 Dezember 2008, 13:07:20
Quote: 
(das Glückskind @ 22 12 2008,13:05)

Carpe Diem.  :;):


:confused4:  Nutze den Tag? Wäre ich nie drauf gekommen.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 22 Dezember 2008, 14:25:29
Naja, keine Ahnung - so im übertragenen Sinne, dachte ich. "mach das Meiste (?) aus dem Jetzt", "nutze den Augenblick", so ungefähr waren meine Assoziationen. :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 23 Dezember 2008, 16:17:47
Finde ich eine wirklich gute Übersetzung.

Oder könnte gemeint sein, dass man die Chancen jetzt gleich (und nicht etwa später) nutzen sollte?
Ist fast das Gleiche, nur die Betonung ist etwas anders.

Carpe Diem ist aber eine sehr elegante Lösung.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Jules am 30 Dezember 2008, 02:15:11
I just called my hostparents in Texas over the holidays and i had to see, that my english is getting worse. It's a shame, really. I try doing my best, but I think, only reading in english is not enough. I mean, you have to speak the language, dont you?
Years ago, I tried just to talk english with my friends. Didnt work. We were all former exchange students, but still, we just switched too often into german.
 
@Kat: Where do you live? In the states? Or somewhere else?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 30 Dezember 2008, 21:37:06
@ jules: yes i do . but right now i am in germany... and believe me, i am freezing my ass off ! LOL (ne echt - kalt hier)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 02 Januar 2009, 22:55:43
Quote: 
(Tulpe @ 23 12 2008,16:17)

Finde ich eine wirklich gute Übersetzung.

Oder könnte gemeint sein, dass man die Chancen jetzt gleich (und nicht etwa später) nutzen sollte?
Ist fast das Gleiche, nur die Betonung ist etwas anders.

Carpe Diem ist aber eine sehr elegante Lösung.


Dankeschön. :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Jules am 05 Januar 2009, 19:24:53
Quote: 
(Kat @ 30 12 2008,21:37)

@ jules: yes i do . but right now i am in germany... and believe me, i am freezing my ass off ! LOL (ne echt - kalt hier)


So, I assume that you live in a very warm state ;)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 05 Januar 2009, 21:05:56
Quote: 
(Jules @ 05 01 2009,12:24)

So, I assume that you live in a very warm state ;)


I live in New Orleans, Louisiana.

Right now, it's about 74.5 F (24 C) - yeah, it's warm and toasty here.

BTW, it's the same with all languages: if you don't use it, you lose it.

I had about 13 years of Russian and French - now, I can barely order a beer in either of these languages ...  :blush:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 05 Januar 2009, 21:09:18
It's not a shame that you can't order a beer in French - that's something you'll never use in France. They certainly don't know how to brew beer.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 06 Januar 2009, 02:37:26
Quote: 
(markus @ 05 01 2009,14:09)

It's not a shame that you can't order a beer in French - that's something you'll never use in France. They certainly don't know how to brew beer.


*bruelllllllllllllllll* now that was funny!  :jestera:  :jestera:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Jules am 06 Januar 2009, 18:57:04
Oh, I came to New Orleans around Christmas '02. It was really beautiful, I enjoyed it very much.
Especially my Hostmum vomiting all over the ääähm Reling   on the Mississippi äääähm... Dampfer...

oder so :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 06 Januar 2009, 19:05:55
Quote: 
(Jules @ 06 01 2009,11:57)

Oh, I came to New Orleans around Christmas '02. It was really beautiful, I enjoyed it very much.
Especially my Hostmum vomiting all over the ääähm Reling   on the Mississippi äääähm... Dampfer...

oder so :D


You must be talking about the "Natchez" . So, I take it - ya'll hung out at Bourbon Street a bit too long and went on a tour and she got sick? LOL


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Jules am 06 Januar 2009, 20:49:40
Not really.
But still, it was fun :)
And we went into a kind of a mall and there were more christmas decorations than you could imagine.
But the best thing was: Ok, Jules, come on, lets get our christmas tree and we'll decorate it.
I was like: yeah! shopping!
and what did she do?
she went into my bedroom, into my closet and got out a large package - containing:
The Christmas Tree!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 10 Januar 2009, 22:32:06
Kennt das jemand?
Brutus ad sum iam forte / Caesar aderat / Brutus sic in omnibus / Caesar sic in at.
oder:
Brutus et erat forti / Caesar et sum iam / Brutus sic in omnibus / Caesar sic intram.

(Brutus had some jam for tea / Caesar had a rat / Brutus sick in omnibus / Caesar sick in hat.) :D
(Brutus ate a rat for tea / Caesar ate some jam / Brutus sick in omnibus / Caesar sick in tram.)






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 10 Januar 2009, 23:15:24
is that something like pig latin?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 11 Januar 2009, 16:01:34
I know it as Dog Latin.  :D

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dog_Latin


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 14 Januar 2009, 17:49:52
I like the way one can turn nouns into verbs:

"I bottom line this for you" (just now in "The King of Queens")
"to brown bag"
"to bullshit"

Any more examples? Is this a speciality of American English?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 15 Januar 2009, 21:39:41
"to google" ...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 16 Januar 2009, 12:01:40
Probably out of fashion again: "to tape" as in video-tape, as in "Can you tape the royal wedding for me?"
* to cycle
* to shop (as in "I still have to shop for Christmas")
* to table (as in "to table a motion/proposal/idea") - interestingly, this has completely different meanings in British English and US English. In BrE, it means to put on the agenda, in US English, it means to postpone indefinitely


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 16 Januar 2009, 21:36:02
Quote: 
(Eisblume @ 16 01 2009,12:01)

... - interestingly, this has completely different meanings in British English and US English. In BrE, it means to put on the agenda, in US English, it means to postpone indefinitely


This is indeed an interesting field: the differences between Britisch and American English (and I'm not talking about the slightly different spelling of some words)
E.g. fag - two very (!) different meanings in BE and AE.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 16 Januar 2009, 21:51:44
Quote: 
(Tulpe @ 16 01 2009,14:36)

E.g. fag - two very (!) different meanings in BE and AE.


since I am too lazy to google ( :D ), what's the BE meaning?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 16 Januar 2009, 23:33:45
a cigarette


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 16 Januar 2009, 23:45:27
Oh my lord …. How funny is that?!  :)

BTW, I have the hardest time understanding BE in general. I cannot watch a movie with Hugh Grant for instance. I guess it stems from me learning my English here in the south. Also, most people cannot pin point where I am from at all .. I get stuff like: “Are you from Australia or Finland?”


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 18 Januar 2009, 14:53:44
Quote: 
(Kat @ 16 01 2009,23:45)

Oh my lord …. How funny is that?!  :)

BTW, I have the hardest time understanding BE in general. I cannot watch a movie with Hugh Grant for instance. I guess it stems from me learning my English here in the south. Also, most people cannot pin point where I am from at all .. I get stuff like: “Are you from Australia or Finland?”


http://www.effingpot.com/

'ere you go darlin' ...  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 19 Januar 2009, 23:20:43

Blow me - When an English colleague of mine exclaimed "Blow Me" in front of a large American audience, he brought the house down.




not **** sherlock ...   :jestera:  :jestera:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 19 Januar 2009, 23:25:49
Currently I'm working on a translation where one of the persons concerned is called Bender.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 20 Januar 2009, 00:05:41
Quote: 
(Tulpe @ 19 01 2009,16:25)

Currently I'm working on a translation where one of the persons concerned is called Bender.


so which one is he - the first or the second kind of a bender ?

Or are you talking about Futurama ?  :;):


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 20 Januar 2009, 00:21:37
Naa, all I know is he's a book keeper.

Familiar with this?

Rhyming Slang


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 20 Januar 2009, 00:38:31
LMAO ---- this BE sure is funny to me. I don't know any of these terms and phrases ....

the only 2 words I use frequently are : schedule and privacy (pronounced in BE) ... I think it just sounds so neat ;-) . Of course none of my peeps over here know what I am talking about ....


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 29 Januar 2009, 11:53:56
Hi my dears, ich bräuchte mal fix eure Hilfe.  :blush:
Krampfe mir gerade an so einem Disclaimer-Dings einen ab, wo drinstehen soll, dass Gerichtstand Leipzig ist und dass "Irrtümer und aktuelle Programmänderungen" vorbehalten bleiben. (Da soll noch mehr drinstehen, aber den Rest habe ich mir, dank englischer COSMOPOLITAN, schon zusammengstoppelt.)

Würde/könnte man das so schreiben:

This agreement shall be governed by German law, the courts of Leipzig shall have exclusive jurisdiction.

Every effort is made to ensure the content is correct at the time of going to press. Subject to alteration. Errors excepted.


Anybody?  :blush:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Marcus am 29 Januar 2009, 17:58:09
Quote: 
(Kat @ 05 01 2009,21:05)

BTW, it's the same with all languages: if you don't use it, you lose it.


:blush:  :gung:

When I lived in North-Rhine-Westphalia, I didn't have many occasions to talk English with somebody. A few months ago, I realized that I understand Englisch much more better than I can speak it. (It's normal, I know.) So I decided to improve my English by daily pratice and I found someone I can speak in English with. But I also want to improve my written English. For this reason I think, I will be here more often in future. ;-)

(I'm grateful for every correction.)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 29 Januar 2009, 18:36:21
Quote: 
(das Glückskind @ 29 01 2009,04:53)

Every effort is made to ensure the content is correct at the time of going to press. Subject to alteration. Errors excepted.


The information is provided by [company] and whilst we endeavor to keep the information up-to-date and correct, we make no representations or warranties of any kind, express or implied, about the completeness, accuracy, reliability, suitability or availability with respect to the information, products, services etc for any purpose. Any reliance you place on such information is therefore strictly at your own risk.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 30 Januar 2009, 11:01:24
Wow!

Dankeschön.  :bussi:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 30 Januar 2009, 16:01:14
np...  :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 03 Februar 2009, 19:18:44
Ich brauch' mal Hilfe...


She's agreed: from now to 'til she's 18, the star of "The Secret Life of Bees" isn't going to be holding up any 7-11s, having an unwanted teen pregnancy, or getting any tattoos or piercings.


Was hat das Fettgedruckte zu bedeuten? 7-11s?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 03 Februar 2009, 20:57:40
7/11 ist ne Supermarktkette


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 03 Februar 2009, 22:04:32
Ah, danke, dann kapiere ich das jetzt auch...  thanks! :)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 04 Februar 2009, 03:10:49
Quote: 
(markus @ 03 02 2009,13:57)

7/11 ist ne Supermarktkette


correction" 7/ eleven ... not 7/11

it started out as the business hours 7am - 11pm . (now it's 24 hours), and it's not a supermarket its a convenience store - huge difference (i go to one every morning)






Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Girlfriend am 06 Februar 2009, 19:10:37
Wir standen gestern vor dem Problem einem Amerikaner (in Deutschland wohnend) verständlich zu machen, dass der Hersteller seines Tisches diesen zur Instandsetzung ins Werk haben möchte und er für die Zeit Leihware von uns bekommt. Bei Leo steht, dass es wohl im englischen kein Wort für Leihware gibt. Ein Kollege hat sich heute aber irgendwie verständlich machen können. Hat jemand einen Tipp, was man da sagen kann, wenn sowas noch mal vorkommt?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 06 Februar 2009, 22:01:53
Kann man da nicht sowas sagen wie: "In the meantime we'll provide you with a temporary replacement for the table"?

Also, dass ihr solange einen Ersatztisch stellt.

KAT!! Hilf mal!  :D


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 07 Februar 2009, 02:30:59
ok. wenn ich das richtig verstanden hab, dann wolltet ihr ihm ein "loaner" geben.  d.h. nur ausleihweise bis der richtige tisch kommt?! (Tulpe hat das schon richtig gesagt - ein temporary replacement )

so. just tell him: we will give you a "loaner " until your table will arrive.

und wenn er zicken machen sollte:" you want a fucking loaner dude, get it your fucking self ... and quit fucking bugging us!" (ok ... that was just a joke ... ) :)

note: Tulpe... i know language ...  :pfanne:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 07 Februar 2009, 11:11:17
:jestera:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Girlfriend am 07 Februar 2009, 11:12:13
Das werde ich mir mal ausdrucken, danke! Wie kann ich denn sagen, dass der Hersteller den Tisch überarbeitet?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 07 Februar 2009, 15:38:30
Das kommt drauf an - in welcher Hinsicht überarbeitet?
War der schlampig gearbeitet oder ist das Design falsch?
Wird er repariert?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Girlfriend am 08 Februar 2009, 14:33:31
Schlampig verarbeitet trifft es am ehesten.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 10 Februar 2009, 00:09:27
Quote: 
(Girlfriend @ 07 02 2009,04:12)

....  Wie kann ich denn sagen, dass der Hersteller den Tisch überarbeitet?


The manufacturer is currently working to correct a flaw in their design.

Weiter wuerde ich da gar nicht draufeingehen, denn es ist ja schliesslich nicht EUER product sondern das von einem hersteller…


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Girlfriend am 11 Februar 2009, 20:05:30
Supi, danke.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 10 April 2009, 20:01:12
"Unter anderem" soll auf Englisch "e. i." heißen. Stimmt das und wofür stehen die beiden Buchstaben?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Schildkröte am 10 April 2009, 20:51:24
i.a. könnte ich erklären (inter alia), aber e.i. sagt mir nichts.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 10 April 2009, 22:38:27
Ich kenn nur das englische "e.g." (exempli gratia) als "zum Beispiel".

Evtl. steht also auch in D21s Fall das "e" für exemplum.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Schildkröte am 11 April 2009, 08:55:35
Kat, überall schreibst Du, vor allem, dass Dir langweilig sei, aber hier hilfst Du nicht...!

Na, vielleicht ja doch?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 12 April 2009, 22:41:04
Im Eastenders Forum habe ich eben diesen Spruch gelesen:
"He's about as funny as getting an arrow through the neck and finding the gas bill attatched to it" - den muss ich mir merken!  


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Schildkröte am 13 April 2009, 07:46:57
Der ist wirklich super, Tulpe!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 13 April 2009, 20:25:53
Inzwischen habe ich erfahren, dass der Spruch aus "Blackadder Goes Forth" stammt.  


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 13 April 2009, 20:34:00
Zitat: (Schildkröte @ 11 Apr. 2009, 01:55 )

Kat, überall schreibst Du, vor allem, dass Dir langweilig sei, aber hier hilfst Du nicht...!

Na, vielleicht ja doch?

ooooops... sorry erst jetzt gesehen " selective viewing" ?!

Also: i.e. kommt aus dem latain und meint 'id est' also 'that is' or 'it is'.
Also ist es schon richtig , dass man i.e. als unter anderem uebersetzen werden kann.
Z.b.: I am surrounded by a bunch of idiots, i.e. John, Tom, Rudi etc, etc …


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Schildkröte am 13 April 2009, 20:50:58
Aber es war ja e.i. nicht i.e.





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 13 April 2009, 20:57:48
Zitat: (Schildkröte @ 13 Apr. 2009, 13:50 )

Aber es war ja e.i. nicht i.e.

i say potato you say potAto  

ich glaub es war ein tippfehler von d21


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Schildkröte am 13 April 2009, 21:01:15
Tippfehler sind bei Abkürzungen schon ziemlich irreführend!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 26 April 2009, 16:16:42
Dieser Spruch habe ich eben in einem Guardian-Forum gelesen:
"I once took a course in speaking bollocks but never finished it. You obviously graduated with honours."
Sehr sophisticated way, um auszudrücken, dass man grundsätzlich anderer Meinung ist, finde ich.  





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 28 April 2009, 13:13:37
Quote: (Kat @ 13 Apr. 2009, 20:34 )

Quote: (Schildkröte @ 11 Apr. 2009, 01:55 )

Kat, überall schreibst Du, vor allem, dass Dir langweilig sei, aber hier hilfst Du nicht...!

Na, vielleicht ja doch?

ooooops... sorry erst jetzt gesehen " selective viewing" ?!

Also: i.e. kommt aus dem latain und meint 'id est' also 'that is' or 'it is'.
Also ist es schon richtig , dass man i.e. als unter anderem uebersetzen werden kann.
Z.b.: I am surrounded by a bunch of idiots, i.e. John, Tom, Rudi etc, etc …

Besten Dank!!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 01 Mai 2009, 12:20:21
Akzente für Fortgeschrittene:

Omid Djalili: Accent Shifting Syndrome

Omid Djalili: Nigerianitis





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 01 Mai 2009, 13:48:48
Zitat: (Tulpe @ 13 Apr. 2009, 20:25 )

Inzwischen habe ich erfahren, dass der Spruch aus "Blackadder Goes Forth" stammt.  

ja, das passt


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Malke am 10 Juli 2009, 10:17:48
Hier blubbert Lisa aus den USA fröhlich über Idioms, Missverständnisse und Bilder, die sich bei manchen Sprüchen aufdrängen:
http://lemongloria.blogspot.com/2009/07/raised-in-barn-rant.html

Bin da zufällig drauf gestoßen und ich glaub, Frau und Blog sind durchaus interessant. Lisa scheint ziemlich rumgekommen zu sein auf der Welt.





Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 25 Oktober 2009, 15:21:55
"I too think less of men who don't open doors, or surrender seats to those who need it more. It makes me wonder how long it takes the sores on their knuckles to heal after walking for a while."
     


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: zuiop am 15 November 2009, 16:56:00
Jetzt brauch ich auch mal Hilfe. Jemand schreibt über einen Musiker:


A journalist told me off-the-record that when he interviewed R, the man had a b.o. issue. lol

Was ist ein b. o. issue?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 15 November 2009, 20:43:04
Da hat jemand es wohl nicht mit der Hygiene...  

b.o. = bad odour = unangenehmer Körpergeruch


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: zuiop am 15 November 2009, 20:49:29
Körpergeruch!?     Das hatte ich nicht erwartet. Danke!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 19 November 2009, 17:25:49
Zitat: (Tiamat @ 15 Nov. 2009, 13:43 )

b.o. = bad odour = unangenehmer Körpergeruch

schon richtig, aber b.o. stands for "body odor"


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Lunatic am 19 März 2010, 20:07:35
Ich habe mich entschlossen dieses Semester eine Facharbeit im Englisch-LK zu schreiben. Jetzt bin ich am überlegen über welches Thema. Das Thema muss semesterbezogen sein, also entweder zum American Dream oder zur Globalisation. Hat einer von euch vielleicht eine Idee oder selbst auch mal eine geschrieben?

Ich hab schonmal überlegt über die Lage der Native Americans (Indianer) früher und heute zu schreiben. Evtl. auch was zum Obama-Hype oder Klimawandel in Bezug auf die Globalisation.
Was auch gehen würde, wäre eine Analyse zu einem Film oder Buch, ausgenommen da "American Beauty" und "Death of a Salesman".
Für Ideen und Vorschläge wäre ich also dankbar.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 24 März 2010, 12:00:03
Lunatic, mir fällt spontan nicht so richtig was ein - die Idee mit den Native Americans finde ich aber ganz gut (diese nämlich z. B. als "Verlierer" des American Dream). Ein anderer Aspekt wäre zu beleuchten, wie sich der American Dream und was er umfaßt im Lauf der Jahrhunderte verändert hat.
Zu Film oder Buch und The American Dream fällt mir The Great Gatsby ein (wurde auch verfilmt) - ist aber seeeeehr abgenudelt, ansonsten im Moment nicht viel. Vielleicht kommt aber noch was...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 24 März 2010, 20:52:23
hm, da faellt mir gerade das thema meiner diplomarbeit ein " die us amerikanische einwanderungspolitik und ihre auswirkungen auf die gesellschaft "(oder so aehnlich)...
sehr komplexes thema, was ich nach 100 seiten auch mitbekommen hab  


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 25 März 2010, 15:19:54
Lunatic, ich bin nochmal in mich gegangen:

Buch: The Tortilla Curtain von T.C. Boyle (The Tortilla Curtain)
Buch: Moon Palace von Paul Auster (Moon Palace)
Film: Crash von Paul Haggis (Crash)

Googel mal, das wird offensichtlich gern genommen...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 28 März 2010, 17:04:25
Wie heißt "Feldsalat" auf Englisch?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 28 März 2010, 17:13:18
Lamb's lettuce


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 28 März 2010, 20:50:11
Besten Dank!  


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Malke am 15 Juli 2010, 13:18:32
Jetzt bin ich platt: auf einer amerikanischen Website finde ich den Ausdruck "earworm" für "Ohrwurm": http://www.theboot.com/2010/07/09/catchy-songs/

Dass man den Ausdruck im Englischsprachigen Raum kennt, wundert mich jetzt. Meine internationalen Kollegen fanden es vor Jahren sehr witzig, als ihnen "mein" deutscher Graphiker erklärt hat, wie man in Deutschland zu diesem Phänomen sagt. "Earworm" (Ohrwurm) und "Pigdog" (Schweinehund) fanden sie ganz klasse.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 24 August 2010, 14:22:35
Frage an die Englischkundigen hier an Board:

Wenn man von "großzügigen Fensterflächen" spricht (also im Sinne von hell, gute Rundumsicht etc.), was verwendet man da am besten für "großzügig"?

Bei Leo hab ich ne große Liste, laut den Foreneinträgen sollte ich am ehesten "lavish" verwenden, ist das richtig? "Generous" bezieht sich ja eher auf großzügig im monetären Sinne.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Schildkröte am 24 August 2010, 16:07:06
Schau mal hier:
http://www.linguee.de/deutsch-englisch?sourceoverride=german&source=auto&query=gro%DFz%FCgige+fensterfl%E4chen

Diese Suchmaschine durchsucht ganze Sätze, die von anderen übersetzt wurden, so dass die Begriffe im Kontext stehen. Ist für einiges sehr praktisch. :smile:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Malke am 25 August 2010, 09:00:55
Mit Linguee arbeite ich auch gern.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 25 August 2010, 12:47:54
danke, Schildkröte. Der Link hat mir sehr weitergeholfen und ist schon bei den Lesezeichen :smile:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Malke am 26 August 2010, 09:23:37
Ich bin in letzte Zeit öfter mal über den Ausdruck "douchbag" gestolpert. Dass das keine Schmeichelei ist, war mir schon klar. Dank urbandictionary.com bin ich nun etwas schlauer:

Zitat
Someone who has surpassed the levels of jerk and asshole, however not yet reached fucker or motherfucker.

Aha. Ich vermute, das ist sowas wie ein bescheuerter Lackaffe. Nur noch schlimmer.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 27 August 2010, 14:01:07
Das sind aber sehr diffizilie Abstufungen.  :biggrin:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Malke am 27 August 2010, 14:21:44
Ja, nä? "Schlimm, aber nicht sooo schlimm".  :smile:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 27 August 2010, 14:56:01
Genau.  :biggrin:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 12 Oktober 2010, 11:37:39
Wie kann ich denn

"Cost for land ready to build" in ein Wort fassen, verdammich, mir fällt absolut nix ein. Kosten für Baustelle (das ist gemeint) fertig zum Bauen machen.... Klingt doch blöd.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 12 Oktober 2010, 11:42:55
In dem Zusammenhang:

Groundwork for foundations? Grundstein für Stiftungen? Hä? Soll was mit Bauarbeiten zu tun haben....

Baugrundarbeiten, gibt's das?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Malke am 12 Oktober 2010, 11:44:23
Wie kann ich denn

"Cost for land ready to build" in ein Wort fassen, verdammich, mir fällt absolut nix ein. Kosten für Baustelle (das ist gemeint) fertig zum Bauen machen.... Klingt doch blöd.

Erschließungskosten?
Oder ist das wieder was anderes?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Malke am 12 Oktober 2010, 11:46:14
Und ist das zweite Erdaushub für die Fundamente? Oder denke da zu profan?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 12 Oktober 2010, 11:46:56
Oder ist schon das erschlossene Bauland gemeint?
 
Beim zweiten nehme ich an, dass das Fundament gemeint ist.

edit auch.  :biggrin:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Malke am 12 Oktober 2010, 11:52:24
1. "Erschlossenes Bauland" ist einleuchtender als meine Interpretation.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 12 Oktober 2010, 11:56:45
Nein, die Erschließungskosten sind einleuchtender, aber ich hab ja hier mehr Informationen. Ihr seid die Größten, danke!

2. Ist auch logisch. Geht leider weiter:

Non structural steelworks...

Nicht-Stahlarbeiten? Was ist das denn für ein Quatsch? Steht unter der Überschrift Interior work (Innenausbau?)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 12 Oktober 2010, 11:58:38
EDP false floor, soll das Linoleum sein? Da muss ich auch noch in den Ö-Thread, Linoleum sagen die nämlich, glaube ich, nicht.... *indenanderenthreadhecht*


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:02:35
edit: Nee, war Blödsinn.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:05:37
Cash desks... Bargeld-Deck? Muss es im Laden geben...

Ich hab keinen anderen zum fragen.... :bawling:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:08:12
"false floor" ist ein Doppelboden  (http://de.wikipedia.org/wiki/Doppelboden), EDP weiß ich noch nicht...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:08:57
Cash desk ist die Kasse, wie auch immer gestaltet, zum Beispiel Kassentheke (ich kenne mich da fachsprachlich nicht so aus).


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:10:33
"non-structural steelworks" sind nichttragende Stahlkonstruktionen
Edit: und Interior work ist tatsächlich der Innenausbau


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:11:44
Jaaa, vielen Dank!

fittings for furniture, sind das nur Möbelbeschläge?

Übrigens, ich bin nicht zu faul zum selber suchen, ich hab vorher alle ca. 1000 Begriffe, die mir, weil Fachbegriffe, nicht geläufig sind, durch Übersetzer gejagt. Ich frage hier nur nach den komischen Ergebnissen, will heißen, was mir nicht richtig erscheint.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:16:10
Ja, ähm, Übersetzer. Wenn man sich nicht auskennt, kann das ins Auge gehen...

EDP könnte Epoxy Deck Paint sein, bin mir aber nicht sicher! Außerdem weiß ich nicht genau, wie das auf Deutsch heißt. Epoxydharz-Decklackierung vielleicht.
Edit: fittings for furniture: Ich denke ja. Ohne Kontext ist es immer schwierig...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Schildkröte am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:18:58
Hast Du bei linguee geschaut, doli?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:24:16
nein, babelfish und google. Alle (ca) 980 Begriffe hat es 1A übersetzt, ich weiß ja schon, um was es geht, wenigstens, ob ich das schon mal gehört habe und ob es passt.

Die Möbelbeschläge kommen mir komisch vor. Aber jeder übersetzt es ja so.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Schildkröte am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:27:13
Da dort Texte surchsuchgt werden, die zweisprachig im Netz sind, kann man da auch den Zusammenhang lesen, ich finde das extrem hilfreich. Ansonsten ist Leo vermutlich auch besser als google.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:31:03
 :gung:
Bei Leo steht auch (meistens) das Fachgebiet dabei. Allerdings fehlen bei Leo noch einige Fachbereiche, man merkt doch stark, daß es vom Maschinenbau etc. kommt.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:36:33
Ihr habt mir schon sehr geholfen, ist alles in einem logischen Zusammenhang, bis auf diese Abkürzung EDP, das ist mir jetzt wurscht.

Dankeschön!  :knicks:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Schildkröte am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:40:53
EDP kann wohl auch EDV-Verkabelung sein. Also vielleicht dass doppelte Böden gelegt werden, durch die dann die ganzen Kabel laufen? Wenn das im Zusammenhang passt, vielleicht hilft es ja.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 12 Oktober 2010, 12:50:36
 :led: Stimmt! EDP wiring wäre das dann eigentlich, aber wer wird denn so kleinlich sein... Passen würd's auch, denke ich - so von ferne.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 12 Oktober 2010, 13:05:09
Ich habe es nur Doppelboden genannt, das impliziert das m.E. ja schon, dass da was drunter ist.  :danke:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 13 November 2010, 18:36:44
It is way to early for a bridal expo = Es ist viel zu früh für eine Brautschau??


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 15 November 2010, 17:49:55
Brautschau im Sinne von Brautmodenschau, - ausstellung, -messe? Ja, ich denke schon.
Im Sinne von "sich auf der Suche nach einer Braut befinden" - nein.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 19 November 2010, 18:34:38
The European Commission has just announced an agreement whereby English will be the official language of the European Union rather than German, which was the other possibility.

As part of the negotiations, the British Government conceded that English spelling had some room for improvement and has accepted a 5- year phase-in plan that would become known as “Euro-English”.
In the first year, “s” will replace the soft “c”.. Sertainly, this will make the sivil servants jump with joy. The hard “c” will be dropped in favour of “k”. This should klear up konfusion, and keyboards kan have one less letter.
There will be growing publik enthusiasm in the sekond year when the troublesome “ph” will be replaced with “f”.. This will make words like fotograf 20% shorter.
In the 3rd year, publik akseptanse of the new spelling kan be expekted to reach the stage where more komplikated changes are possible.
Governments will enkourage the removal of double letters which have always ben a deterent to akurate speling.
Also, al wil agre that the horibl mes of the silent “e” in the languag is disgrasful and it should go away.
By the 4th yer people wil be reseptiv to steps such as replasing “th” with “z” and “w” with “v”.
During ze fifz yer, ze unesesary “o” kan be dropd from vords kontaining “ou” and after ziz fifz yer, ve vil hav a reil sensi bl riten styl.
Zer vil be no mor trubl or difikultis and evrivun vil find it ezi TU understand ech oza. Ze drem of a united urop vil finali kum tru.
Und efter ze fifz yer, ve vil al be speking German like zey vunted in ze forst plas.




Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 19 November 2010, 18:45:20
 :biggrin:

Meine Tochter verbreitet es schon weiter.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: zuiop am 24 November 2010, 16:37:48
Wie fragt man am besten, ob eine CD schon abgeschickt wurde?


"Did you send the CD already?" ist vermutlich falsch, oder?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 24 November 2010, 16:43:16
Have you already sent the CD?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: zuiop am 24 November 2010, 16:45:54
 :danke:



Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Lunatic am 14 Februar 2011, 18:16:50
Ich muss/will demnächst einen Test in Englisch ablegen, und zwar diesen hier (http://www.cambridgeesol.org/deutsch/exams/cae.php). Hat irgendeiner damit schon Erfahrungen gesammelt? Hat vielleicht einer einen Buchtipp zur Vorbereitung? Ich bereite mich ja jetzt schon auf meine Abiturprüfung im Englisch-LK vor, diesen Test muss ich aber fürs Studium ablegen. Bis jetzt schau ich halt britisches Fernsehen und hör die BBC im Radio, lese Nachrichtenartikel und so.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: timo1979 am 14 Februar 2011, 19:44:29
Ich finde das hier sehr gut gemacht:

http://www.amazon.de/Advanced-Language-Practice-Students-Book/dp/3190228884/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1297709013&sr=8-1


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 15 Februar 2011, 12:38:35
Ich hab das CAE und auch das CPE gemacht, aber das ist schon Jahre her. Ich glaube, ich hab mich nicht besonders drauf vorbereitet.  :blush:

Englische Nachrichten schauen etc. ist schon mal ganz gut, um das verstehende Hören zu üben. Du solltest vielleicht auch noch das freie Reden üben, Lunatic. Such Dir ein Thema und mach ein kleines Referat, oder übe paarweise mit einem/einer Freund/in.


Titel: Re:Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Kat am 16 Februar 2011, 04:49:46
LOL ... ich bin ja nun schon fast auf dem weg ins bette... aber...

ich hab damals auch den test gemacht. jetzt, wo ich wieder zurueck zur Uni gehe, musste ich auch den "vortest" machen. ich sag mal so, einfach ist es nicht - ich hatte 100%, aber ich lebe auch hier. die vorbereitungsbuecher sind abzocke ... wie schon gesagt, versuch die "anwendung" , wenn du weisst was ich meine ... wenn du das geld hast, investiere in einen 4 monats course an einer der renomierten universitaeten hier und du hast keine probleme. lass mich wissen, wie ich dir helfen koennte ... Tulane University hat ihr eigenes ESL- institut ... just saying...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Lunatic am 27 Februar 2011, 19:59:37
Hier ein kleines Update:

Ich habe mir zuerst dieses hier bestellt und gestern bekommen.
http://www.amazon.de/gp/product/0521739160/

Das Buch, welches Timo mir empfohlen hat, bekomme ich morgen.

Ich habe aber eben gesehen das der Test je nach Ort zwischen 160 und 210 € kostet  :ohnmacht:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 27 Februar 2011, 20:58:45
Ich liebe Schottisch!

Eben bei Taggart: "If you lie to me I'll have you fartin' through your ears, my wee son.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 28 Februar 2011, 15:48:01
Oooohhhh...  :inlove:
Taggart hab ich früher immer auf dem Holländer geguckt. Das waren noch Zeiten...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 04 April 2011, 12:47:11
Diesen Satz von Charlie Brooker finde ich grandios:
"The majority of people are perfectly capable of interacting with retail staff without spitting on them or whipping their hides like dawdling cattle, but planet Earth still harbours more than its fair share of disappointments."

Aus:
http://www.guardian.co.uk/commentisfree/2011/apr/04/charlie-brooker-shop-snobs


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Pinguin am 18 Mai 2011, 10:41:20
Welche Wortstellung ist richtig:

I have done this already.

oder

I have already done this.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 18 Mai 2011, 11:09:05
1) müsste richtig sein, 2) vermutlich auch, wenn man's entsprechend betonen möchte.
Aber ich bin eine Englisch-Niete, lieber Zweitmeinung einholen!  :biggrin:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 18 Mai 2011, 21:26:55
Beides ist richtig - aber 2) ist die meist benutzte Version.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Pinguin am 19 Mai 2011, 10:39:48
Danke, Tiamat.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 19 Januar 2012, 21:27:25
Die Englisch-Kenner werden gelangweilt lächeln, ich habe heute in meinem aktuellen Englisch-Unterricht das erste mal vom Ausdruck "my pet hate" gehört und hab nach anfänglicher wörtlichen Übersetzung dann doch mitbekommen, dass es nicht um ein ungeliebtes Haustier geht. :biggrin: Jetzt grübel ich die ganze Zeit, was denn das Gegenstück im Deutschen ist, wie sagt man denn da bei uns? Ich komm und komm nicht drauf...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Schildkröte am 19 Januar 2012, 21:40:01
Den Ausdruck kannte ich nicht, danke!

Bei Dir würde ich es mit "Hantz" übersetzen  :tounge:

Im LEO-Forum steht "Lieblingshassobjekt", was ich einigermaßen gelungen finde. "Aids-Wunschlistenkandidat Nr. 1" trifft ja nur auf Personen zu und ist eher sperrig ;)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 19 Januar 2012, 21:43:50
 :biggrin: Der ist aber schön pc-unkompatibel.

Hantz ist gut. :biggrin: Ich suche dennoch noch nach etwas anderem, aber scheinbar gibt's nichts im Deutschen, was es anders umschreibt.

Die "Lehrerin" ist übrigens waschechte Engländerin, ich könnte ihr stundenlang zuhören. Meine letzten Trainer waren jeweils ein Ami und ein Australier, das gefällt mir überhaupt nicht.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Lunatic am 19 Januar 2012, 22:46:54
Hier ist auch eine nette Erklärung dafür

http://idioms.thefreedictionary.com/pet+hate

Im Deutschen überlege ich auch grad welchen begriff es da gibt. Vielleicht das rote Tuch was einen aggro macht, wobei das aber auch wieder  etwas zu stark ist.

Edit: Oder einfach ich hasse es wie die Pest.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 19 Januar 2012, 22:49:23
Das rote Tuch finde ich aber irgendwie doch passend, danke!  :smile: Also so als Umschreibung.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 02 Mai 2012, 10:27:40
Ich habe ein tolles neues Wort gelernt: whataboutery.

Erklärung hier:
http://jaycueaitch.wordpress.com/2012/01/08/deflecting-criticism-3-whataboutery/



Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Lunatic am 16 Mai 2012, 17:17:36
Ich wollte mir für mein Anglistik und Amerikanistikstudium ein Wörterbuch anschaffen. Dabei hab ich an dieses hier gedacht.
http://www.amazon.de/Oxford-American-Dictionary-Angus-Stevenson/dp/0195392884/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1337180225&sr=8-1

Kennt das zufällig jemand von euch und hat vielleicht noch Alternativen? Preislich ist es eigentlich egal. Wichtig ist mir nur das die Lautschrift drin ist und das es sich um AE handelt da ich da auch meinen Focus drauflegen werde. Mit BE kann ich da nichts anfangen. Vielen dank schon mal.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 16 Mai 2012, 17:54:38
Das kenne ich leider nicht, kann dazu also nichts sagen.
Ich bin ein großer Fan von Merriam-Webster und würde daher das empfehlen: http://www.amazon.de/11th-Collegiate-Dictionary-Merriam-Websters-Laminated/dp/0877798079/ref=pd_cp_eb_0

Leider kann auf die Schnelle nicht ergründen, ob es Lautschrift enthält. Bei dem, das mir vorliegt, ist das der Fall.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Lunatic am 16 Mai 2012, 22:06:46
Vielen Dank. Das klingt schon mal sehr interessant. Laut Datenbank hat die Bibliothek die zehnte Edition als Präsenzbestand da. Das wird ich mir am Freitag mal rassuchen.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 17 Mai 2012, 22:31:37
My pleasure...


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 24 September 2012, 14:26:21
Meine Güte, wie stell ich mich denn heute an...

Ich will sagen "Die zentrale Ansprechperson werde ich sein". "it will be myself?",  "I will be?". Je  mehr ich Translater benutze, umso unsicherer werde ich. Man sollte das nehmen, was man zuerst denkt, aber der Zug is nu raus bei mir. Hilfe!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 24 September 2012, 15:05:06
"it's me" So einfach, oder?  :ohnmacht:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 24 September 2012, 15:10:51
Einfach nur it's me, oder wolltest Du schreiben "It's me who ...." ?

Mich hatte bei Deiner Vorgabe irgendwie die Zukunftsform irritiert. Sonst hätte ich nämlich auch einfach geschrieben "I am your contact person (if you have any questions)" oder so. 


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 24 September 2012, 15:13:11
Der ganze Satz lautete "Wir haben am Freitag versprochen, Ihnen eine Kontaktperson zu nennen, das werde ich sein."


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 24 September 2012, 16:26:07
Öh. Dann so wie Du geschrieben hast, würde ich sagen.

Vielleicht "As for the contact person ..." usw.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doli71 am 24 September 2012, 16:35:35
Ist eh' schon weg und sie haben mich verstanden.  :biggrin: Danke!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 10 Januar 2014, 18:20:29
Habe ich eben auf Facebook gelesen:

Käsereklame: "Sweet dreams are made of cheese, who am I to dis a brie?"


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Sam am 10 Januar 2014, 18:21:14
 :biggrin:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tulpe am 10 Januar 2014, 18:47:46
Goggle mal mit dem Satz, dann findest du noch Ergänzungen.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 13 Januar 2014, 09:53:13
Habe ich eben auf Facebook gelesen:

Käsereklame: "Sweet dreams are made of cheese, who am I to dis a brie?"


:jestera:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 13 Januar 2014, 10:24:52
Das ist gut, aber jetzt habe ich einen Ohrwurm.  :biggrin:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: das Glückskind am 13 Januar 2014, 12:39:02
Das ist ja eine echte Werbung für einen echten Käseladen ... entzückend.  :smile:

edit: Ups, hatte Tulpe ja auch schon geschrieben.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 14 Januar 2014, 18:25:31
Whow, wie wild!   :biggrin:

In die Käsesorten könnte ich mich reinsetzen...

Und einen Ohrwurm hab ich nun auch, Annie L. ist nur genial...

 :thumb_up:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 17 Februar 2014, 21:56:33
Ich möchte einer US-Amerikanerin ein Foto erklären, das Kirmesburschen zeigt. Wie stelle ich das an?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: markus am 17 Februar 2014, 22:06:49
Für Kirmes passt carnival am besten, denke ich.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 17 Februar 2014, 22:15:51
Bei Leo steht "Kermis" als amerikanische Übersetzung. Allerdings steht dahinter "regional".


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Chaosqueen am 17 Februar 2014, 23:11:16
Kat eine email/PN senden und da nachfragen?  ;)  :biggrin:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Shimuwini am 17 Februar 2014, 23:35:20
das Wort "Oktoberfest" ist auch in den USA ein Begriff und wenn es nicht um das Oktoberfest als solches geht, dann als "like Oktoberfest" beschreiben ;)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 18 Februar 2014, 17:10:04
Ich danke Euch allen! Mal sehen, was Kat antwortet!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 08 Mai 2014, 09:00:24
Dringende Frage: Was heißt Bankvollmacht auf Englisch? Bei Leo scheinen sich die Leute nicht einig zu sein.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Sam am 08 Mai 2014, 10:57:10
http://www.dict.cc/deutsch-englisch/Kontovollmacht.html (http://www.dict.cc/deutsch-englisch/Kontovollmacht.html)


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 08 Mai 2014, 11:05:36
http://www.dict.cc/deutsch-englisch/Kontovollmacht.html (http://www.dict.cc/deutsch-englisch/Kontovollmacht.html)

Danke, ist schon erledigt. Ich hatte in 2 Threads gefragt.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Chaosqueen am 06 Mai 2015, 10:54:49
Vielleicht kann mir jemand im anderen Thread weiter helfen?
http://www.listraforum.de/smf/index.php?topic=3656.msg1433679#msg1433679


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: doozer am 12 November 2015, 19:09:13
Today Little-Doozerin (11)
tried to tell me something about a famous English tale: "Robin Hood lived in the 12th yearhundred."
 :ohnmacht:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: bockmouth am 14 November 2015, 18:30:16
 :biggrin:

Wie wild!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 02 September 2016, 01:37:19
Ich hatte eine lustige Skype-Unterhaltung mit einem Briten J. :biggrin:


J: have anything interesting to eat today?
T: uh, just noodles with tomato sauce
J: hm never had that
   had pasta with tomato and herb sauce
   don't think id like it with noodles
T: huh aren't pasta noodles?
J: kinda
   but like I wouldn't want spaghetti with just tomato and her sauce
T: I see... (brits are sure weird... they difference between noodles and pasta... :D)
J: noodles are asian, pasta European/italian
T: wow I never thought of that
    Noodle in German is Nudel and we refer it to anything pasta-related
    if we refer to noodles from Asia, we simply call them Asian noodles / Asiatische Nudeln :D
J: oh weird I didnt imagine there would be a difference like that
    would tomato sauce and Asian noodles be strange to you too then?
T: yea I guess :D
J:  oh good thank you


Ich wusste gar nicht, dass im englischsprachigen Raum "noodles" mit asiatischen Nudeln gleichgesetzt werden. Sieht man auch sogar, wenn man "noodles" bei Google Bilder eingibt. :smile:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 20 September 2016, 15:28:07
The choir won the production of (the) CD [Name] in recognition of their outstanding performance.

Das eingeklammerte "the" muss doch dahin, oder geht das in der Formulierung tatsächlich auch ohne Artikel?
Die (professionellen) Übersetzer unseres Booklets haben es jedenfalls weggelassen, das verunsichert mich. Aber sie könnten ja auch schlicht ein Wort vergessen haben.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: hanswurtebrot am 23 September 2016, 09:59:38
Hallo, Englischexperten?  :bawling:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 23 September 2016, 14:21:14
Ich würde auch sagen, dass das "the" dazugehört.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Eisblume am 23 September 2016, 14:31:37
Tja. Ich würde es auch sagen, daß der bestimmte Artikel da hingehört, aber ich kann es leider nicht begründen, es ist nur nach Gehör.
Manchmal braucht man im Englischen keinen bestimmten Artikel, hier wüßte ich aber nicht, warum das so sein sollte.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 21 Januar 2017, 22:20:34
Wie würdet Ihr "Six Walls" übersetzen bzw. was assoziiert Ihr bei dem Wort "Walls" zuerst?


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Valentine am 21 Januar 2017, 22:57:10
Walls = Wände, oder Mauern


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 21 Januar 2017, 23:52:10
Ja, danke, aber es denkt halt jeder (Laie) an Mauern und nicht an Wände?!


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Sam am 21 Januar 2017, 23:58:13
kommt das nicht auch auf den Kontext an?
und reicht zur Klärung nicht das hier?

http://dict.leo.org/englisch-deutsch/


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 22 Januar 2017, 13:47:44
Ich sag ja nur, wie ich es empfinde, und er hat es ja auch geändert.

http://www.listraforum.de/smf/index.php?topic=3656.2250


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Sam am 22 Januar 2017, 17:40:31
ich seh da immer noch keinen Kontext, is' aber auch egal


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 27 Januar 2017, 23:48:11
Ich habe heute in einer Email geschrieben: Das habe ich mehrmals erwähnt.

Dann habe ich darüber nachgedacht, wie es denn im folgenden Beispiel heißt:

Ich habe es ein- oder zweimal erwähnt heißt ja "once or twice".

Wie sagt man denn bei "zwei- oder dreimal"? "Twice or three times" oder "two or three times"? Das Zweite klingt für mich richtiger.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 28 Januar 2017, 09:05:15
Beides geht. Ich würde aber auch "two or three times" schreiben.

Es gibt zwar das Wort "thrice" für dreimal, aber das ist veraltet.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 03 Februar 2017, 04:36:50
 :thumb_up:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 12 Juni 2017, 23:24:55
Übersetzung von Redewendungen ins Englische:

"He makes him me nothing you nothing out of the dust."


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 23 Juli 2017, 09:19:59
Confucius said:

"Only when a mosquito lands on your testicles, you will learn to solve problems without violence."



Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: D21 am 05 April 2019, 05:28:11
https://www.facebook.com/UNILADTech/videos/2006252413013018/UzpfSTE1Mjk5ODkwODk6MTAyMTg0NjU4OTE5ODg0ODQ/

 :biggrin:


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 23 April 2019, 14:41:13
Wie übersetzt man das am besten, wenn man in einer Aufstellung hinter einen Betrag auf Deutsch "Betrag zu hoch, wird noch immer von Fa. xy geklärt" schreiben würde.

Also der Betrag, der dort steht, wird von uns/mir nicht akzeptiert, und die Firma, die ihn berechnet hat, soll das nochmal überprüfen anhand der Einwände, die ich habe. Dies will ich dem Empfänger der Aufstellung mitteilen.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: Tiamat am 24 April 2019, 01:11:31
"Charge higher than expected, currently being clarified by Company X"  würde ich schreiben.


Titel: Englisch für alle
Beitrag von: salessia am 24 April 2019, 07:37:00
"Charge higher than expected, currently being clarified by Company X"  würde ich schreiben.

Vielen vielen Dank! Das "currently being clarified" ist genau das, was ich sagen will. Dass es noch im Gange ist sozusagen. Ich bin nicht auf das "currently being" gekommen.  :smile: